Archive for November, 2008

Change You Should Believe In

Somewhere in America, a mother loses her son to the war in Iraq, a father’s job ships overseas, an elderly man’s retirement fund has evaporated, a young woman works the night shift after a full day of college but still cannot provide health care for her ailing sister, and each are hoping for a better tomorrow and praying for a brighter day to come. This year, a young senator from Illinois and an old senator from Arizona embody this hope for these people and millions like them. For the past nearly two years, Barack Obama and John McCain have engaged in a historic presidential run, captivated the hearts of Americans, and turned the apathetic into the awed and the bitter into believers.
Regardless of who wins the election, politics as we know it will never be the same. By the time anybody reads this article, the election will probably be over, and history will have been made. Consequently, this article is not an official Beacon endorsement for any candidate but rather an inquisition into how we, as Christians, should view this battle of hope and experience in light of being followers of Christ.
There are essentially three categories that I think most people fall into: the uninformed, the informed, and…everyone else, I guess.
First, the uninformed crowd. Let’s be honest. Some people simply do not care about politics. Especially at a church setting, it seems, being informed about these issues always takes a backseat to the sanctification of your fellow brothers and sisters in Christ and yourself. This is not to say that all those who are not informed do not care for politics at all, but it just does not seem as important as “Christian stuff.” For others, it seems that life goes on no matter who is in office or what happens in Washington and as a result, they find no reason to read up on the news or care who is running for president. Though I would be hard-pressed to find any passage in the Bible that says you have to maintain a steady discipline of CNN and BBC News intake, I would like to submit this smidgen of logic: God is a sovereign God. He is omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent. Fittingly, the scope of God’s power and grace cannot be limited to the local church or in our personal sanctification. Romans 8:28 reminds us, “God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” And so, it is not too far a stretch to conclude that God’s handiworks, even in politics, are instruments of carrying out His will and making His glory known. Therefore, as Christians, we cannot turn a blind eye to what happens in Washington or dichotomize issues into God and non-God. In the end, being uninformed is not a sin, but caring about what goes on in the country and being informed can help us gain a better view, understanding, and appreciation for the depth and extent of God’s grace.
And for the informed, I would caution that the close nature of this election has made it easier to polarize fellow brothers and sisters because of their political differences. Experience, albeit little for me, has taught me two lessons. One is that some battles are not worth fighting. For example, trying to convince someone that Obama is the antichrist or that McCain is a warmonger are issues that I consider absolutely trivial and fruitless. The second is that 1 Corinthians 8:1 (Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up) most certainly holds true when it comes to talking about politics. Some who consider themselves informed condescend, some argue, and unfortunately, some get so worked up upon discovering fundamental differences in values and opinions in others that they inadvertently remove love (and consequently God) from their efforts to ostensibly reform the other person. However, just as I mentioned above, because God’s handiworks is in everything, including politics, discussions about it should never be devoid of God and love. In other words, since we are to be united as the body of Christ, political discussions can occur with the intent to educate and encourage, but should never come as a means of division.
For everyone else, make no mistake as the next candidate, regardless of who he is, will succeed a president who has received one of the lowest approval ratings ever, averaged what economists call a “dismal 1.7/5 for economic management,” alienated other parties, and damaged relations with the rest of the world. He will inherit what “The Economist” calls “the most difficult international situation since 1968,” and what Colin Powell describes as a “daunting period” for the nation. Times will inevitably be tough these next few years and in these trials, we invariably find people who believe that a candidate will be the solution to these problems. In this election, perhaps more than ever, we find citizens holding firmly to a hope in these candidates—to what McCain promises as “reform, prosperity, peace” or what Obama calls, “change you can believe in.”
Although it is not wrong to want a better or a more prosperous future for yourself and your family, one must remember to never desire these things more than desiring God—a theme we find in 1 Samuel 12. After God has given the Israelites a king, He reminds them that their ultimate responsibility is to obey His commands:
“Now here is the king you have chosen, the one you asked for; see the Lord has set a king over you. If you fear the Lord and serve and obey him and do not rebel against his commands, and if both you and the king who reigns over you follow the Lord your God – good! But if you do not obey the Lord,…His hand will be against you, as it was against your fathers.”
Similarly, God has blessed us with a democracy where we have the privilege of voting. However, much as the Israelites needed to be reminded, we must also be reminded that our hope in these candidates should never supersede the things of God and our hope in Him, or as Pastor Patrick so aptly put it, “God’s plan was never for our ultimate hope to be established through government or politics.”
In regards to the political makeup of our church, though bipartisanship remains an integral part of our government, it has no place in fellowship. Political conversations can be healthy and educational, but political agendas should never come at the cost of needlessly dividing fellow brothers and sisters in Christ. We are all children of God saved by the same grace and imputed the same righteousness, and politics should never make us lose sight of this truth: “Consequently, you are no longer foreigners and aliens, but fellow citizens with God’s people and members of God’s household, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the chief cornerstone.” (Eph 2:19)
We now find ourselves either bracing for or embracing the next President of the United States but regardless of party affiliation, we must remember Paul’s exhortation in Romans 12:2 to “not be conformed to this world but to be transformed by the renewing of our minds.” For people like the mother and her son in Iraq, the father and his unstable job, the elderly man, or the hardworking young woman, every passing election will assuredly bring promises of reform, prosperity, and change they supposedly can believe in. However, as Christians, do these hardships cause us to turn to certain candidates in such a way as to lessen our dependence on the sovereignty and grace of God? Do we get more worked up about the things of politics than the things of God? Are we more eager to spread our political agendas than the Gospel?
Ultimately for all Christians, for the informed and uninformed alike, in light of this election, we must never let these promises and issues make us lose sight of our ultimate Hope—the Hope that has transformed and renewed our minds, the Hope which gives us the change we can and must believe in.

by Ed Yip

Somewhere in America, a mother loses her son to the war in Iraq, a father’s job ships overseas, an elderly man’s retirement fund has evaporated, a young woman works the night shift after a full day of college but still cannot provide health care for her ailing sister, and each are hoping for a better tomorrow and praying for a brighter day to come. This year, a young senator from Illinois and an old senator from Arizona embody this hope for these people and millions like them. For the past nearly two years, Barack Obama and John McCain have engaged in a historic presidential run, captivated the hearts of Americans, and turned the apathetic into the awed and the bitter into believers.

Regardless of who wins the election, politics as we know it will never be the same. By the time anybody reads this article, the election will probably be over, and history will have been made. Consequently, this article is not an official Beacon endorsement for any candidate but rather an inquisition into how we, as Christians, should view this battle of hope and experience in light of being followers of Christ.

There are essentially three categories that I think most people fall into: the uninformed, the informed, and…everyone else, I guess.

First, the uninformed crowd. Let’s be honest. Some people simply do not care about politics. Especially at a church setting, it seems, being informed about these issues always takes a backseat to the sanctification of your fellow brothers and sisters in Christ and yourself. This is not to say that all those who are not informed do not care for politics at all, but it just does not seem as important as “Christian stuff.” For others, it seems that life goes on no matter who is in office or what happens in Washington and as a result, they find no reason to read up on the news or care who is running for president. Though I would be hard-pressed to find any passage in the Bible that says you have to maintain a steady discipline of CNN and BBC News intake, I would like to submit this smidgen of logic: God is a sovereign God. He is omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent. Fittingly, the scope of God’s power and grace cannot be limited to the local church or in our personal sanctification. Romans 8:28 reminds us, “God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” And so, it is not too far a stretch to conclude that God’s handiworks, even in politics, are instruments of carrying out His will and making His glory known. Therefore, as Christians, we cannot turn a blind eye to what happens in Washington or dichotomize issues into God and non-God. In the end, being uninformed is not a sin, but caring about what goes on in the country and being informed can help us gain a better view, understanding, and appreciation for the depth and extent of God’s grace.

And for the informed, I would caution that the close nature of this election has made it easier to polarize fellow brothers and sisters because of their political differences. Experience, albeit little for me, has taught me two lessons. One is that some battles are not worth fighting. For example, trying to convince someone that Obama is the antichrist or that McCain is a warmonger are issues that I consider absolutely trivial and fruitless. The second is that 1 Corinthians 8:1 (Knowledge puffs up, but love builds up) most certainly holds true when it comes to talking about politics. Some who consider themselves informed condescend, some argue, and unfortunately, some get so worked up upon discovering fundamental differences in values and opinions in others that they inadvertently remove love (and consequently God) from their efforts to ostensibly reform the other person. However, just as I mentioned above, because God’s handiworks is in everything, including politics, discussions about it should never be devoid of God and love. In other words, since we are to be united as the body of Christ, political discussions can occur with the intent to educate and encourage, but should never come as a means of division.

For everyone else, make no mistake as the next candidate, regardless of who he is, will succeed a president who has received one of the lowest approval ratings ever, averaged what economists call a “dismal 1.7/5 for economic management,” alienated other parties, and damaged relations with the rest of the world. He will inherit what “The Economist” calls “the most difficult international situation since 1968,” and what Colin Powell describes as a “daunting period” for the nation. Times will inevitably be tough these next few years and in these trials, we invariably find people who believe that a candidate will be the solution to these problems. In this election, perhaps more than ever, we find citizens holding firmly to a hope in these candidates—to what McCain promises as “reform, prosperity, peace” or what Obama calls, “change you can believe in.”

Although it is not wrong to want a better or a more prosperous future for yourself and your family, one must remember to never desire these things more than desiring God—a theme we find in 1 Samuel 12. After God has given the Israelites a king, He reminds them that their ultimate responsibility is to obey His commands:

“Now here is the king you have chosen, the one you asked for; see the Lord has set a king over you. If you fear the Lord and serve and obey him and do not rebel against his commands, and if both you and the king who reigns over you follow the Lord your God – good! But if you do not obey the Lord,…His hand will be against you, as it was against your fathers.”

Similarly, God has blessed us with a democracy where we have the privilege of voting. However, much as the Israelites needed to be reminded, we must also be reminded that our hope in these candidates should never supersede the things of God and our hope in Him, or as Pastor Patrick so aptly put it, “God’s plan was never for our ultimate hope to be established through government or politics.”

In regards to the political makeup of our church, though bipartisanship remains an integral part of our government, it has no place in fellowship. Political conversations can be healthy and educational, but political agendas should never come at the cost of needlessly dividing fellow brothers and sisters in Christ. We are all children of God saved by the same grace and imputed the same righteousness, and politics should never make us lose sight of this truth: “Consequently, you are no longer foreigners and aliens, but fellow citizens with God’s people and members of God’s household, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the chief cornerstone.” (Eph 2:19)

We now find ourselves either bracing for or embracing the next President of the United States but regardless of party affiliation, we must remember Paul’s exhortation in Romans 12:2 to “not be conformed to this world but to be transformed by the renewing of our minds.” For people like the mother and her son in Iraq, the father and his unstable job, the elderly man, or the hardworking young woman, every passing election will assuredly bring promises of reform, prosperity, and change they supposedly can believe in. However, as Christians, do these hardships cause us to turn to certain candidates in such a way as to lessen our dependence on the sovereignty and grace of God? Do we get more worked up about the things of politics than the things of God? Are we more eager to spread our political agendas than the Gospel?

Ultimately for all Christians, for the informed and uninformed alike, in light of this election, we must never let these promises and issues make us lose sight of our ultimate Hope—the Hope that has transformed and renewed our minds, the Hope which gives us the change we can and must believe in.

Sports Ministry

by Garrett Glende

As the leaves turn and the weather cools, sports fans mark their calendars for their team’s next big game. Fall is here and the new season brings about the most exciting months for many die hard followers of the Chargers, Trojans, or (quite unfortunately) the Lakers. Here at LBC, guys and gals alike drape themselves in their team’s colors and gather together to have fun and cheer on their favorite team. But most would much rather spend their time in fellowship, actually playing in the games themselves. This is the reason for the sports ministry.
Whether it be playing basketball, softball, football, soccer, or volleyball, Lighthouse definitely has its fair share of talented athletes who love to get on the field and compete. The sports ministry provides a more formal venue for members to come together and get to know one another more through sports. For many people, especially guys, the easiest way to make friends is to go play ball on a Saturday afternoon or Sunday after church. In this way, sports provide an immediate connection that creates comfort and makes it easier to have deeper conversations. Many members make a deliberate effort to participate in sports activities for the specific purpose of encouraging the body and fellowshipping with other brothers and sisters.
Among the organized events that the sports ministry oversees is the Lighthouse Bible Church Basketball Association, LBCBA, and the men’s and women’s Mission Bowl’s. LBCBA is a basketball league that takes place during the spring months where players are split into teams that play against each other every week. Games are fairly intense and competitive, but the captains stress that God’s glory is at stake in everything we do, even playing basketball. Through LBCBA, people have learned that winning is not the most important thing when playing. The glory of God and the testimony of the Christian are at stake every time you step onto the court. Non-believers should be able to observe any LBCBA game and notice a difference from the rest of the world in terms of attitude, respect, and character. We must shine the light even on the court.
Probably the most notable of all the sports ministry events is the annual flag football tournament, the Mission Bowl. The goal of the tournament is to raise money in support of LBC mission teams to the Czech Republic and Argentina, while building relationships with other local churches and having fun on the field. For many members, the Mission Bowl marks an exciting few months in the year where weekends are filled with practices and many opportunities to meet new people. Football provides a great way to make friends and become more comfortable at LBC. Most players enjoy the practices themselves more than the actual tournament. There is something about those times in practice playing together that encourages unity and fellowship. Daniel Chong, who is a part of LBC’s College Life ministry, says that “football is a great sport due to the unity that it requires to execute a play correctly, which is exactly the reason why it’s a great way to fellowship with older brothers in Christ.” This year’s tournament is sure to provide just as much fun and excitement as the previous contests. The men’s tournament will be held on November 15th and the women’s will be on November 22nd. If you are interested in playing, contact Jin Lee (men) or Hansol An (women).
Overall, the sports ministry is a great opportunity to serve the church in a very practical way. In one sense, it is encouraging just to see people come out and play even if they might not be as skilled as others. In this ministry of attendance, fellow brothers and sisters are encouraged by a devotion to building up and participating in Christ’s church. So even if you don’t think you’re cut out for it, consider it a way to fellowship and build relationships within the body of Christ. Go Lighthouse!
As the leaves turn and the weather cools, sports fans mark their calendars for their team’s next big game. Fall is here and the new season brings about the most exciting months for many die hard followers of the Chargers, Trojans, or (quite unfortunately) the Lakers. Here at LBC, guys and gals alike drape themselves in their team’s colors and gather together to have fun and cheer on their favorite team. But most would much rather spend their time in fellowship, actually playing in the games themselves. This is the reason for the sports ministry.
Whether it be playing basketball, softball, football, soccer, or volleyball, Lighthouse definitely has its fair share of talented athletes who love to get on the field and compete. The sports ministry provides a more formal venue for members to come together and get to know one another more through sports. For many people, especially guys, the easiest way to make friends is to go play ball on a Saturday afternoon or Sunday after church. In this way, sports provide an immediate connection that creates comfort and makes it easier to have deeper conversations. Many members make a deliberate effort to participate in sports activities for the specific purpose of encouraging the body and fellowshipping with other brothers and sisters.
Among the organized events that the sports ministry oversees is the Lighthouse Bible Church Basketball Association, LBCBA, and the men’s and women’s Mission Bowl’s. LBCBA is a basketball league that takes place during the spring months where players are split into teams that play against each other every week. Games are fairly intense and competitive, but the captains stress that God’s glory is at stake in everything we do, even playing basketball. Through LBCBA, people have learned that winning is not the most important thing when playing. The glory of God and the testimony of the Christian are at stake every time you step onto the court. Non-believers should be able to observe any LBCBA game and notice a difference from the rest of the world in terms of attitude, respect, and character. We must shine the light even on the court.
Probably the most notable of all the sports ministry events is the annual flag football tournament, the Mission Bowl. The goal of the tournament is to raise money in support of LBC mission teams to the Czech Republic and Argentina, while building relationships with other local churches and having fun on the field. For many members, the Mission Bowl marks an exciting few months in the year where weekends are filled with practices and many opportunities to meet new people. Football provides a great way to make friends and become more comfortable at LBC. Most players enjoy the practices themselves more than the actual tournament. There is something about those times in practice playing together that encourages unity and fellowship. Daniel Chong, who is a part of LBC’s College Life ministry, says that “football is a great sport due to the unity that it requires to execute a play correctly, which is exactly the reason why it’s a great way to fellowship with older brothers in Christ.” This year’s tournament is sure to provide just as much fun and excitement as the previous contests. The men’s tournament will be held on November 15th and the women’s will be on November 22nd. If you are interested in playing, contact Jin Lee (men) or Hansol An (women).
Overall, the sports ministry is a great opportunity to serve the church in a very practical way. In one sense, it is encouraging just to see people come out and play even if they might not be as skilled as others. In this ministry of attendance, fellow brothers and sisters are encouraged by a devotion to building up and participating in Christ’s church. So even if you don’t think you’re cut out for it, consider it a way to fellowship and build relationships within the body of Christ.
Go Lighthouse!

The Case for Prop 8

by David Ahn

For those of you who already feel like the presidential election has been decided long ago, it’s easy to lose motivation to actually go out and vote. However, there is one very important issue on the ballot where your vote DOES matter: Prop 8, which places the following 14 words into the California Constitution: “Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid and recognized in California.” Recent polls have shown the percentage difference between No and Yes voters to be less than 5 percent. Both campaigns are readily aware of the closeness of the issue, and have raised staggering levels of fundraising and have been blitzing the airwaves with commercials. This is an issue where every vote, including yours, counts.
Since most of us have a biblical understanding of marriage and homosexuality, we share an understanding that marriage is between one man and one woman. However, opponents of Prop 8 have attempted to stifle our voices and opinions by portraying the issue as one of civil rights and equality. To summarize, one of their television ads states, “Regardless of how you feel about marriage, it’s wrong to treat people differently under the law.” Unfortunately, the public has seemingly bought into this notion. Newspapers and corporations (including AT&T, Apple, and Google) have all publicly come out in support of the No on Prop 8 campaign. Prominent figures such as Governor Schwarzeneggar and Senator Obama have explicitly stated that they believe marriage to be between one man and one woman, but yet have opposed the proposition.
However, most unfortunate of all is the fact that many of us Christians have bought into this lie as well, and we often feel ashamed to let our voice be heard, or fear imposing our views on those who don’t agree with us. However, this is NOT an issue about civil rights. Currently, same-sex civil unions have the EXACT same legal rights and privileges under California law. The issue, then, is in the definition of marriage. If you take the definition provided by opponents of Prop 8 (“marriage as being between two loving and committed individuals”), then surely banning gay marriage is unjust. But what makes THEIR definition any more inherently valid than ours? Also, their definition is equally guilty of being exclusive to certain groups of people: it excludes marriages of more than two people; and, although it doesn’t explicitly state it, I would assume that their definition excludes members of the same family from getting married as well. I know that sounds silly and obvious, but if the issue were truly about equality and fundamental rights, then who has the authority to say that love between one group of people is any lesser than love from another group of people? No one. There could be no definition of marriage at all.
For quite some time now, marriage has consistently been between a man and a woman. The terms “husband” and “wife” go hand in hand. When you see someone wearing a wedding ring, there is no doubt in your mind what the sex of their significant other is. As Christians, that definition of marriage is even more clear, as it is used to portray the church as Christ’s bride, or as it talks about the roles of husbands and wives. For the past thousands of years, across different cultures and generations, the definition of marriage has never been unclear. Why should we let it be now? Vote Yes on Prop 8.

For those of you who already feel like the presidential election has been decided long ago, it’s easy to lose motivation to actually go out and vote. However, there is one very important issue on the ballot where your vote DOES matter: Prop 8, which places the following 14 words into the California Constitution: “Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid and recognized in California.” Recent polls have shown the percentage difference between No and Yes voters to be less than 5 percent. Both campaigns are readily aware of the closeness of the issue, and have raised staggering levels of fundraising and have been blitzing the airwaves with commercials. This is an issue where every vote, including yours, counts.

Since most of us have a biblical understanding of marriage and homosexuality, we share an understanding that marriage is between one man and one woman. However, opponents of Prop 8 have attempted to stifle our voices and opinions by portraying the issue as one of civil rights and equality. To summarize, one of their television ads states, “Regardless of how you feel about marriage, it’s wrong to treat people differently under the law.” Unfortunately, the public has seemingly bought into this notion. Newspapers and corporations (including AT&T, Apple, and Google) have all publicly come out in support of the No on Prop 8 campaign. Prominent figures such as Governor Schwarzeneggar and Senator Obama have explicitly stated that they believe marriage to be between one man and one woman, but yet have opposed the proposition.

However, most unfortunate of all is the fact that many of us Christians have bought into this lie as well, and we often feel ashamed to let our voice be heard, or fear imposing our views on those who don’t agree with us. However, this is NOT an issue about civil rights. Currently, same-sex civil unions have the EXACT same legal rights and privileges under California law. The issue, then, is in the definition of marriage. If you take the definition provided by opponents of Prop 8 (“marriage as being between two loving and committed individuals”), then surely banning gay marriage is unjust. But what makes THEIR definition any more inherently valid than ours? Also, their definition is equally guilty of being exclusive to certain groups of people: it excludes marriages of more than two people; and, although it doesn’t explicitly state it, I would assume that their definition excludes members of the same family from getting married as well. I know that sounds silly and obvious, but if the issue were truly about equality and fundamental rights, then who has the authority to say that love between one group of people is any lesser than love from another group of people? No one. There could be no definition of marriage at all.

For quite some time now, marriage has consistently been between a man and a woman. The terms “husband” and “wife” go hand in hand. When you see someone wearing a wedding ring, there is no doubt in your mind what the sex of their significant other is. As Christians, that definition of marriage is even more clear, as it is used to portray the church as Christ’s bride, or as it talks about the roles of husbands and wives. For the past thousands of years, across different cultures and generations, the definition of marriage has never been unclear. Why should we let it be now? Vote Yes on Prop 8.

Beto and Liliana Barrionuevo

by Jennifer Shin

What I noticed about Beto and Liliana when I first met them four years ago was that they were very humble and gentlespirited. Beto would faithfully lead praise on the guitar during each service, Bible study, and meeting. Liliana would always greet and embrace us with a warm smile. They’ve been a married couple whom I have looked up to as an example of faithfulness from the very start.
Beto and Liliana first met during an evangelistic campaign, similar to what we have each year when we go on missions to Argentina. Beto was working in the neighborhood where Liliana was living and someone from his church invited her out to church. Beto’s friend introduced them. What Beto first noticed about Liliana was her dedication to and fellowship with God. What caught Liliana’s eye about Beto was that he had a tremendous heart for serving the Lord and people.
Their relationship started out as a friendship and Beto later started thinking about pursuing a relationship with her. He first prayed that he would be faithful to the things of God and then began praying for a relationship with Liliana. After he approached her with what he had been thinking and praying about, they prayed for six months to know if it was the will of God or not before they began dating. After two years of dating, they were married on July 17, 1993.
A typical day for the Barrionuevo family is very packed. Both Liliana and Beto wake up much earlier than their children do to start the day spending time with God. Beto then heads over to the government building to work as Liliana works hard at home as a homemaker, taking care of their three children. In the afternoons, they take their youngest child, Esteban, to the doctors due to health problems and to special teachers to help him learn. They are also very involved in the life of the church as they are leading Bible studies at barrio 24 de Septiembre and discipling many people in that area. When they are not working or tending to their children, Beto and Liliana are meeting with pastor Jorge and Norma, meeting with other couples for discipleship, or studying to prepare for the Bible studies and children’s programs. Liliana stated, “The weekends are dedicated to all the church activities.”
One of the challenges that Beto faces is being an example, both as a father and as a leader at the church. He understands that he must put effort into his own life. He knows that God is working in him, but also realizes that he needs to make God-honoring decisions as he provides protection, advice, and counsel for the people around him.
Liliana finds it a challenge to prepare herself in working with the women at 24 de Septiembre. As she finds herself busy day-in day-out, she sees the need to read and study God’s Word more. She stated, “That’s why I am always praying to God because women are always coming to me for counsel. And at home, it’s the same because I’m ministering to my children.”
Beto and Liliana have asked us to pray for their family and that each one of them, including their children (Ana, Elie, Esteban), would have the desire to love and serve God. They are also asking God to provide them with a home as they are living with Beto’s parents at the moment. They have also been invited to study at Word of Life, the Bible institute in Buenos Aires, but are unsure of whether they are able to or not. Please pray that Beto would receive special permission to study at Word of Life for a year and be able to return to his job after.
To the Lighthouse church family, they want to say that all the people who have come in the past four years to share the gospel with the Argentines have tremendously encouraged them – they see the love that you all have for the people there. They hope that everyone remembers what they did in Argentina and that they would do the same with as much fervor back in the States. They also want to say thank you to everyone at the church for supporting those who were able to serve in Argentina this year. They know that the team wouldn’t have been there without the support of the church.

What I noticed about Beto and Liliana when I first met them four years ago was that they were very humble and gentlespirited. Beto would faithfully lead praise on the guitar during each service, Bible study, and meeting. Liliana would always greet and embrace us with a warm smile. They’ve been a married couple whom I have looked up to as an example of faithfulness from the very start.

Beto and Liliana first met during an evangelistic campaign, similar to what we have each year when we go on missions to Argentina. Beto was working in the neighborhood where Liliana was living and someone from his church invited her out to church. Beto’s friend introduced them. What Beto first noticed about Liliana was her dedication to and fellowship with God. What caught Liliana’s eye about Beto was that he had a tremendous heart for serving the Lord and people.

Their relationship started out as a friendship and Beto later started thinking about pursuing a relationship with her. He first prayed that he would be faithful to the things of God and then began praying for a relationship with Liliana. After he approached her with what he had been thinking and praying about, they prayed for six months to know if it was the will of God or not before they began dating. After two years of dating, they were married on July 17, 1993.

A typical day for the Barrionuevo family is very packed. Both Liliana and Beto wake up much earlier than their children do to start the day spending time with God. Beto then heads over to the government building to work as Liliana works hard at home as a homemaker, taking care of their three children. In the afternoons, they take their youngest child, Esteban, to the doctors due to health problems and to special teachers to help him learn. They are also very involved in the life of the church as they are leading Bible studies at barrio 24 de Septiembre and discipling many people in that area. When they are not working or tending to their children, Beto and Liliana are meeting with pastor Jorge and Norma, meeting with other couples for discipleship, or studying to prepare for the Bible studies and children’s programs. Liliana stated, “The weekends are dedicated to all the church activities.”

One of the challenges that Beto faces is being an example, both as a father and as a leader at the church. He understands that he must put effort into his own life. He knows that God is working in him, but also realizes that he needs to make God-honoring decisions as he provides protection, advice, and counsel for the people around him.

Liliana finds it a challenge to prepare herself in working with the women at 24 de Septiembre. As she finds herself busy day-in day-out, she sees the need to read and study God’s Word more. She stated, “That’s why I am always praying to God because women are always coming to me for counsel. And at home, it’s the same because I’m ministering to my children.”

Beto and Liliana have asked us to pray for their family and that each one of them, including their children (Ana, Elie, Esteban), would have the desire to love and serve God. They are also asking God to provide them with a home as they are living with Beto’s parents at the moment. They have also been invited to study at Word of Life, the Bible institute in Buenos Aires, but are unsure of whether they are able to or not. Please pray that Beto would receive special permission to study at Word of Life for a year and be able to return to his job after.

To the Lighthouse church family, they want to say that all the people who have come in the past four years to share the gospel with the Argentines have tremendously encouraged them – they see the love that you all have for the people there. They hope that everyone remembers what they did in Argentina and that they would do the same with as much fervor back in the States. They also want to say thank you to everyone at the church for supporting those who were able to serve in Argentina this year. They know that the team wouldn’t have been there without the support of the church.

All-Church Retreat 2008

by Courtney Chow

Take a deep breath and imagine you are drawing in the fresh mountain air with a touch of crisp autumn chill. It’s bright and early as you are about to have a warm breakfast before heading off to spend a refreshing hour in God’s word. It may sound too good to be true but its not. Each fall season, Lighthouse presents a unique opportunity for the church family to gather together for a full weekend called All-Church Retreat. This year it will take place on November 7-9 at Pine Valley Bible Conference Center.
All-Church Retreat is more than a tradition. It’s a precious opportunity for people across all affinity groups (children, youth, collegians, singles and families) to spend extended time together. When asked what her favorite part of All-Church camp was Cindy Chu replied: “the fact that the ENTIRE church family goes, and we’re all confined in one general area. It’s such a great time to fellowship, chit chat, and laugh hysterically with mothers, collegians, and singles.”
In addition to spending time together, “It’s a great opportunity to take a step back from the busyness in life and take time to reevaluate your spiritual walk and find new ways to challenge your spiritual growth,” said Chris Tou. A large part of that is due to the blessing of receiving teaching together. This year’s retreat will be focused on the theme of “In Christ Alone” and we will have the opportunity to learn from a guest speaker for the whole weekend. Our speaker, Kurt Gephards is the pastor overseeing the children’s ministry at Grace Community Church and shepherds the single adults’ ministry.
The festivities kick off on Friday night with a time of praise and the fun continues with messages, games, talent show on Saturday night, and corporate worship on Sunday morning. Maybe you’ve been attending Lighthouse for a few months and signed up but are a little nervous because this is your first time attending. Brian Song encourages you with some advice: “There’s always a lot of free time at our retreats and it’s prime time to get to know and encourage one another. If you’re a light sleeper, ear plugs are highly recommended. You never know what noises you’ll hear (both inside and outside the cabin) that may keep you up.”
Whether this is your first or fifth time attending, Chris Lim suggests: “Sit at different tables during the meal times to get to know new people. I think you’ll be surprised how friendly people are.” What do you talk about after you sit down at that table full of people you’ve never spoken to before? “Share what you’ve been learning at home and what you’ve been learning at the retreat. Share about random childhood stories. Share about your favorite thing to eat and make plans to go eat it together upon returning to San Diego. Just share!” said Cindy Chu. Jenna Kim echoed that sentiment, from a slightly different perspective: “I’d recommend for other youth to take advantage of the time to get to know the “old people” (i.e. above 18). It’s easy to just want to be by yourself and then feel sorry for yourself, but make it an opportunity to encourage the adults at church. In all cases I’ve tried, I’ve been very encouraged myself in getting to know the grown-ups. Grown-ups? We’d love to talk to you.”
Personally, I look forward to retreat all year long. I hope that all of you who attend will find the Lighthouse family to be a blessing as we continue to grow and praise our Lord together.

Take a deep breath and imagine you are drawing in the fresh mountain air with a touch of crisp autumn chill. It’s bright and early as you are about to have a warm breakfast before heading off to spend a refreshing hour in God’s word. It may sound too good to be true but its not. Each fall season, Lighthouse presents a unique opportunity for the church family to gather together for a full weekend called All-Church Retreat. This year it will take place on November 7-9 at Pine Valley Bible Conference Center.

All-Church Retreat is more than a tradition. It’s a precious opportunity for people across all affinity groups (children, youth, collegians, singles and families) to spend extended time together. When asked what her favorite part of All-Church camp was Cindy Chu replied: “the fact that the ENTIRE church family goes, and we’re all confined in one general area. It’s such a great time to fellowship, chit chat, and laugh hysterically with mothers, collegians, and singles.”

In addition to spending time together, “It’s a great opportunity to take a step back from the busyness in life and take time to reevaluate your spiritual walk and find new ways to challenge your spiritual growth,” said Chris Tou. A large part of that is due to the blessing of receiving teaching together. This year’s retreat will be focused on the theme of “In Christ Alone” and we will have the opportunity to learn from a guest speaker for the whole weekend. Our speaker, Kurt Gephards is the pastor overseeing the children’s ministry at Grace Community Church and shepherds the single adults’ ministry.

The festivities kick off on Friday night with a time of praise and the fun continues with messages, games, talent show on Saturday night, and corporate worship on Sunday morning. Maybe you’ve been attending Lighthouse for a few months and signed up but are a little nervous because this is your first time attending. Brian Song encourages you with some advice: “There’s always a lot of free time at our retreats and it’s prime time to get to know and encourage one another. If you’re a light sleeper, ear plugs are highly recommended. You never know what noises you’ll hear (both inside and outside the cabin) that may keep you up.”

Whether this is your first or fifth time attending, Chris Lim suggests: “Sit at different tables during the meal times to get to know new people. I think you’ll be surprised how friendly people are.” What do you talk about after you sit down at that table full of people you’ve never spoken to before? “Share what you’ve been learning at home and what you’ve been learning at the retreat. Share about random childhood stories. Share about your favorite thing to eat and make plans to go eat it together upon returning to San Diego. Just share!” said Cindy Chu. Jenna Kim echoed that sentiment, from a slightly different perspective: “I’d recommend for other youth to take advantage of the time to get to know the “old people” (i.e. above 18). It’s easy to just want to be by yourself and then feel sorry for yourself, but make it an opportunity to encourage the adults at church. In all cases I’ve tried, I’ve been very encouraged myself in getting to know the grown-ups. Grown-ups? We’d love to talk to you.”

Personally, I look forward to retreat all year long. I hope that all of you who attend will find the Lighthouse family to be a blessing as we continue to grow and praise our Lord together.

Book Review: A Friendly Letter to Skeptics and Atheists

Myers’ book (if you believe the Amazon reviews), “bridges the gap” between Christianity (which he doesn’t define outside of some very broad strokes, but he seems to be some flavor of Protestant) and the “new atheism” of Dawkins and Dennett who have been quite vocal in their opposition to religion in general and Christianity in particular.  They’ve been throwing around words like “evil,” “worst,” “ridiculous,” and “injustice” in reference for a few years now, ever since Dawkins started garnering more mainstream attention after speaking at TED.
Apparently this is shocking to some people.  I’m not sure why, Jesus Himself said that would happen (Matthew 10:22, Mark 13:13, Luke 6:22, Luke 21:17).  But enough people got their feelings hurt that Myers wrote a book full of reasons why everyone should play nice.
Now before anyone gets the wrong idea, I’m all for civility, kindness, gentleness, truth in love, and self-control when it comes to debating issues, even so-called hot-button issues (which quite frankly, need it the most).  But on matters of irreconcilable differences, let’s call a spade a spade and explore those differences, rather than attempting to reach an unsatisfactory compromise.
Myers’ basic premise seems to be that an “enlightened atheist” and a “progressive theist” are ultimately after the same goal, which is broadly defined as that being what serves the widest social good: liberty, equality, a chicken in every pot, etc.  However, the unspoken assumption (and I must stress it is an assumption, as he doesn’t make the argument explicitly, merely uses the results of the argument liberally), is that the justification for that end is irrelevant compared to the end itself.
And that boggles my mind, both from a theological standpoint, and a philosophical standpoint.
In reverse order, the idea that one can argue from a flawed premise, arrive at a correct conclusion, and be on solid epistemological ground nonetheless is simply philosophically unacceptable.  That is not the way it works.  If your premise is flawed and your conclusion is correct, you are either in error, or have stumbled upon an exception rather than a rule.  It’s fruit of the poisoned tree either way.  For a far more eloquent explanation of this, please see the sidebar by Dr. Bahnsen.
Theologically speaking, we don’t need to go any further than the most frightening passage in the Bible to refute this: Matthew 7:21-23.  “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and in your name drive out demons and perform many miracles?’ Then I will tell them plainly, ‘I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!'”
Plainly, it not a matter purely of WHAT you do, but WHO you know.  When you stand before the Lord in judgment, there is no answer you can give in reference to your works that will save you.  There is only a name.
Myers book is filled with many humorous, interesting, and thought-provoking passages, and for that may be well-worth the evening it would take to read it.  But it seems to miss the obvious and most-critical point that the unbelieving world won’t be saved by some sort of “new ecumenism” whereby both believers and unbelievers join together to combat the ills of society.  We’re called to be in the world but not of the world.  The point is not to agree with the WHAT and ignore the WHY in the name of harmony and warm fuzzy feelings.
As Jesus said in Matthew 5:14-16: “You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.”
I have a few other issues with the book.  Myers holds to some interpretations of scripture that are far more liberal and socially-oriented than what I believe, but mostly to his credit, (with a couple glaring exceptions), he differentiates his opinions from his dogma openly and candidly.  I am far more concerned with a justification for the tenants of Christianity that manages to somehow avoid basing itself on the Word of God.
Because to my mind, that is ultimately the difference between an absolute justification and a mere excuse.
Autonomy Is No Ladder to Christ’s Supreme Authority
By Dr. Greg Bahnsen
The Christian’s final standard, the inspired word of God, teaches us that “the fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge” (Proverbs 1:7). If the apologist treats the starting point of knowledge as something other than reverence for God, then unconditional submission to the unsurpassed greatness of God’s wisdom at the end of his argumentation does not really make sense. There would always be something greater than God’s wisdom – namely, the supposed wisdom of one’s own chosen, intellectual starting point. The word of God would necessarily (logically, if not personally) remain subordinate to that autonomous, final standard.
Ludwig Wittgenstein confessed that a devastating incongruity lay at the heart of his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. If he was correct in his eventual conclusion, then the premises used to reach that conclusion were actually meaningless: “anyone who understands me eventually recognizes [my propositions] as nonsensical, when he has used them – as steps – to climb up beyond them. (He must, so to speak, throw away the ladder after he has climbed up by it)” (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961 [1921], section 6.54, p. 151).
In similar fashion, Evangelicals sometimes utilize an autonomous apologetic method which does not assume the authority of Christ, treating it like a ladder to climb up to acceptance of Christ’s claims, only then to “throw the ladder away” since Christ is now seen as having an ultimate authority which conflicts with that autonomous method. Their method is used to reach a conclusion which is incompatible with what their method assumed – the self-sufficient authority of man’s reasoning.
Penpoint I:1 (October, 1990) © Covenant Media Foundation, 800/553-3938

Book by David Myers

Review by Stephen Rodgers

Myers’ book (if you believe the Amazon reviews), “bridges the gap” between Christianity (which he doesn’t define outside of some very broad strokes, but he seems to be some flavor of Protestant) and the “new atheism” of Dawkins and Dennett who have been quite vocal in their opposition to religion in general and Christianity in particular.  They’ve been throwing around words like “evil,” “worst,” “ridiculous,” and “injustice” in reference for a few years now, ever since Dawkins started garnering more mainstream attention after speaking at TED.

Apparently this is shocking to some people.  I’m not sure why, Jesus Himself said that would happen (Matthew 10:22, Mark 13:13, Luke 6:22, Luke 21:17).  But enough people got their feelings hurt that Myers wrote a book full of reasons why everyone should play nice.

Now before anyone gets the wrong idea, I’m all for civility, kindness, gentleness, truth in love, and self-control when it comes to debating issues, even so-called hot-button issues (which quite frankly, need it the most).  But on matters of irreconcilable differences, let’s call a spade a spade and explore those differences, rather than attempting to reach an unsatisfactory compromise.

Myers’ basic premise seems to be that an “enlightened atheist” and a “progressive theist” are ultimately after the same goal, which is broadly defined as that being what serves the widest social good: liberty, equality, a chicken in every pot, etc.  However, the unspoken assumption (and I must stress it is an assumption, as he doesn’t make the argument explicitly, merely uses the results of the argument liberally), is that the justification for that end is irrelevant compared to the end itself.

And that boggles my mind, both from a theological standpoint, and a philosophical standpoint.

In reverse order, the idea that one can argue from a flawed premise, arrive at a correct conclusion, and be on solid epistemological ground nonetheless is simply philosophically unacceptable.  That is not the way it works.  If your premise is flawed and your conclusion is correct, you are either in error, or have stumbled upon an exception rather than a rule.  It’s fruit of the poisoned tree either way.  For a far more eloquent explanation of this, please see the sidebar by Dr. Bahnsen.

Theologically speaking, we don’t need to go any further than the most frightening passage in the Bible to refute this: Matthew 7:21-23.  “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and in your name drive out demons and perform many miracles?’ Then I will tell them plainly, ‘I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!'”

Plainly, it not a matter purely of WHAT you do, but WHO you know.  When you stand before the Lord in judgment, there is no answer you can give in reference to your works that will save you.  There is only a name.

Myers book is filled with many humorous, interesting, and thought-provoking passages, and for that may be well-worth the evening it would take to read it.  But it seems to miss the obvious and most-critical point that the unbelieving world won’t be saved by some sort of “new ecumenism” whereby both believers and unbelievers join together to combat the ills of society.  We’re called to be in the world but not of the world.  The point is not to agree with the WHAT and ignore the WHY in the name of harmony and warm fuzzy feelings.

As Jesus said in Matthew 5:14-16: “You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden. Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven.”

I have a few other issues with the book.  Myers holds to some interpretations of scripture that are far more liberal and socially-oriented than what I believe, but mostly to his credit, (with a couple glaring exceptions), he differentiates his opinions from his dogma openly and candidly.  I am far more concerned with a justification for the tenants of Christianity that manages to somehow avoid basing itself on the Word of God.

Because to my mind, that is ultimately the difference between an absolute justification and a mere excuse.


Editor’s Note: The article below is included to provide a contrast, and represent a more Biblically-based approach to reason and the Christian worldview.


Autonomy Is No Ladder to Christ’s Supreme Authority

By Dr. Greg Bahnsen

The Christian’s final standard, the inspired word of God, teaches us that “the fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge” (Proverbs 1:7). If the apologist treats the starting point of knowledge as something other than reverence for God, then unconditional submission to the unsurpassed greatness of God’s wisdom at the end of his argumentation does not really make sense. There would always be something greater than God’s wisdom – namely, the supposed wisdom of one’s own chosen, intellectual starting point. The word of God would necessarily (logically, if not personally) remain subordinate to that autonomous, final standard.

Ludwig Wittgenstein confessed that a devastating incongruity lay at the heart of his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. If he was correct in his eventual conclusion, then the premises used to reach that conclusion were actually meaningless: “anyone who understands me eventually recognizes [my propositions] as nonsensical, when he has used them – as steps – to climb up beyond them. (He must, so to speak, throw away the ladder after he has climbed up by it)” (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961 [1921], section 6.54, p. 151).

In similar fashion, Evangelicals sometimes utilize an autonomous apologetic method which does not assume the authority of Christ, treating it like a ladder to climb up to acceptance of Christ’s claims, only then to “throw the ladder away” since Christ is now seen as having an ultimate authority which conflicts with that autonomous method. Their method is used to reach a conclusion which is incompatible with what their method assumed – the self-sufficient authority of man’s reasoning.

Penpoint I:1 (October, 1990) © Covenant Media Foundation, 800/553-3938

Be Still

by Pastor JR Cuevas

Cease striving and know that I am God.
I will be exalted above the nations,
I will be exalted in the earth.
-Psalm 46:10
It was quickly turning out to be a more difficult morning than I had planned. Troubled from circumstances throughout the week, tired from the night before, and having woken up an hour later than I had planned, I found my spirit succumbing to both fatigue and frustration as I galumphed out of the house to my car for another drive up to L.A. But right as I hurriedly shut the trunk door of my car, my eyes suddenly beheld the night sky. With the stars shining brightly, underlined by a wisp of a skyline against the black sky—the most beautiful scene I had ever seen from my house—I immediately remembered Psalm 46:10: “Cease striving and know that I am God.” Frustration turned into admiration as I repented of my sin of forgetting God amidst my busy schedule.
I wouldn’t be surprised if what happened to me that morning happens as a regular occurrence in the lives of many today—not to mention many in history. There’s nothing wrong with having busy schedules; there’s nothing wrong with getting tired. As Christians, we are indeed called to labor to the point of exhaustion. We’re called to fight the good fight like a brave soldier battles in war, to run the race of faith like a marathon runner runs his race. Against the backdrop of the current obsession with comfort and convenience in circumstances, a Christian must fight for Christ-likeness in character. The problem is not busyness. The problem is that, in the midst of busyness, we often forget God. From a mentality that believes that the more we do the better we are, we can allow the burdens of ministry, work, school, relationships, and family to worry us away from God. As we do, we begin to think that we’re in charge, we’re in control, and that—if we don’t accomplish what we perceive to be important—the world would come to an end. In effect, we begin to worship ourselves instead of God.
Psalm 46:10 is simple: God tells us to cease striving in our hearts as if the affairs of the world lie on our shoulders, and to simply know that He is God. While God calls us to fight, run, agonize, and labor to the point of exhaustion, He calls us to remember that He is God. He made the heavens and the earth; we did not. He holds all things together; we do not. He controls the affairs of the nations; we do not. In other words, He is God; we are not. And as God, He reminds us that He will be exalted in the nations and in the earth. In the end, even if we do fulfill our ministries and tasks to the best of our abilities, we will not be exalted amongst people. God alone will be exalted as King before all nations; He alone will be exalted as Mighty Creator in the earth. He is passionate about His name being glorified, and will do everything He needs to do so see that it comes to fruition. Our failures and successes will not prevent Him from doing so.
What good is ministry and service if not done with a heart that marvels at the Creator? God is not simply looking for workers; He is looking for worshippers. Thus, the next time you find yourself tempted to scurry around from task to task with the mentality that your successes and failures will determine the course of history, take some time to be still and meditate on the great Creator, who became the great Savior and calls Himself your Father.
Be still, and know that He is God. And when all else is done, rejoice in knowing that He alone will be exalted.

Cease striving and know that I am God.

I will be exalted above the nations,

I will be exalted in the earth.

-Psalm 46:10

It was quickly turning out to be a more difficult morning than I had planned. Troubled from circumstances throughout the week, tired from the night before, and having woken up an hour later than I had planned, I found my spirit succumbing to both fatigue and frustration as I galumphed out of the house to my car for another drive up to L.A. But right as I hurriedly shut the trunk door of my car, my eyes suddenly beheld the night sky. With the stars shining brightly, underlined by a wisp of a skyline against the black sky—the most beautiful scene I had ever seen from my house—I immediately remembered Psalm 46:10: “Cease striving and know that I am God.” Frustration turned into admiration as I repented of my sin of forgetting God amidst my busy schedule.

I wouldn’t be surprised if what happened to me that morning happens as a regular occurrence in the lives of many today—not to mention many in history. There’s nothing wrong with having busy schedules; there’s nothing wrong with getting tired. As Christians, we are indeed called to labor to the point of exhaustion. We’re called to fight the good fight like a brave soldier battles in war, to run the race of faith like a marathon runner runs his race. Against the backdrop of the current obsession with comfort and convenience in circumstances, a Christian must fight for Christ-likeness in character. The problem is not busyness. The problem is that, in the midst of busyness, we often forget God. From a mentality that believes that the more we do the better we are, we can allow the burdens of ministry, work, school, relationships, and family to worry us away from God. As we do, we begin to think that we’re in charge, we’re in control, and that—if we don’t accomplish what we perceive to be important—the world would come to an end. In effect, we begin to worship ourselves instead of God.

Psalm 46:10 is simple: God tells us to cease striving in our hearts as if the affairs of the world lie on our shoulders, and to simply know that He is God. While God calls us to fight, run, agonize, and labor to the point of exhaustion, He calls us to remember that He is God. He made the heavens and the earth; we did not. He holds all things together; we do not. He controls the affairs of the nations; we do not. In other words, He is God; we are not. And as God, He reminds us that He will be exalted in the nations and in the earth. In the end, even if we do fulfill our ministries and tasks to the best of our abilities, we will not be exalted amongst people. God alone will be exalted as King before all nations; He alone will be exalted as Mighty Creator in the earth. He is passionate about His name being glorified, and will do everything He needs to do so see that it comes to fruition. Our failures and successes will not prevent Him from doing so.

What good is ministry and service if not done with a heart that marvels at the Creator? God is not simply looking for workers; He is looking for worshippers. Thus, the next time you find yourself tempted to scurry around from task to task with the mentality that your successes and failures will determine the course of history, take some time to be still and meditate on the great Creator, who became the great Savior and calls Himself your Father.

Be still, and know that He is God. And when all else is done, rejoice in knowing that He alone will be exalted.


About

The Beacon is the monthly newsletter for Lighthouse Bible Church in San Diego, California. It covers a variety of subjects including LBC events, church history, current events from a Christan perspective, ministry profiles, and messages from our pastors and elders. To join the Beacon ministry, please contact Stephen Rodgers.

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