Archive for October, 2008

Tia Han

by Jen Shin

What have you been doing since you moved back to San Jose?

I’ve been involved at my church up here. I work with the college and single girls Bible study and the church praise team. Home-wise – hanging out with my family a lot, especially my younger cousins. School-wise – Got a teaching credential and now I’m at business school at Santa Clara University. I’m still cracking corny jokes and bringing people to the dark side…of corny jokes.

Have you brought anyone to the dark side?

I have – two of my cousins, two more to go.

Anything else you’ve been up to?

Making excuses to go to San Diego.

What church are you involved at and how has it been there?

East Valley Church. I went back to the church I’ve been going to until I left for college. When I first got back, it was hard, because the church was going through a lot of changes and a difficult period. It’s better this second year around. It has more to do with my own heart rather than the church changing itself. I came in with the attitude of missing Lighthouse. But then, it’s been really good. This past year we’ve had a lot of personal difficulties that people went through. I think it really brought the church together.

What have you been studying with the college and singles girls during Bible study?

We’ve been going through Romans. We’re onto the last passage next week. A lot of the hermeneutics I’ve learned at LBC – I relayed that information to them. So we’ve been going through it like how flocks did Bible studies.

What has God been teaching you lately?

Always lessons on humility. That’s the foundation to everything. But branching from that, I’ve seen how wrong I’ve been viewing my sin. I didn’t see it as something that divided me from God and that it was against Him. There was a lot of self-righteousness. Also not returning evil for evil. It doesn’t have to be huge things – no one is coming after my life or trying to kill me. But in the little things, especially with family. Returning small grievances with grievances. Not to think those are my rights, but be loving in return. It’s a lot harder than it sounds in my head. Since coming home, God is a lot bigger than I thought He was. He’s not only in certain places or people. What I need in order to grow, He’s here too.

What are some of the challenges of being back at home?

Now that I’ve been home for awhile, it’s about not getting so comfortable. When I first moved home, I knew I was coming here as a servant, not as a normal family member where I think I have obligations. But now it takes more effort to stay alert, be awake, and not just grow comfortable. Another challenge is really applying the things that I know that are true, even when I don’t see it happening all the time, whether it’s me continually pursuing holiness or trusting God to transform me or other people. I think living in a family with a lot of unbelievers, they’re quick to say, “Oh that’s naive. Things aren’t that simple.” Just a lot of worldly wisdom that is true in the world but not true in the sense of what God is able to do in working in other people. Trusting that God can provide or change people.

What about the joys?

Seeing my grandpa come to know the Lord before he passed away. Seeing how God really did bring me home at an opportune time. My cousins are all at a certain age – all at different ages. Seeing how they have so many questions and are thinking more about God, even the youngest one. Seeing their hearts soften because of the gospel. Seeing prayers answered through my immediate family. The girls at church are growing and are hungry to know the Word and God and love and obey Him. Seeing God prove faithful to what He says in His Word. How God is sovereign in salvation, even with people who we thought would never be softened or have an interest or come to faith. He does what He says. That makes being up here more than worthwhile, even though I miss friends and church family down there. Seeing these things is so heartening.

Any prayer requests?

Always humility – a humble heart that deeply, truly loves Christ more than anything else. That I will obey, remember, and delight in Him in everything. For the salvation of my mom, brother, cousins, a lot of aunts and uncles. I’m praying for their salvation, that they would come to know Christ. That they wouldn’t just say they know God, but really love God. For the church up here – that we would continue to be firm in the truth and have love for each other and for those who would come into the church. For strong men and leaders in the church, especially for the college/singles ministry. There isn’t a whole lot of guys. Lastly, for uncertainty in where I’ll be, and what I’ll be doing in the next year and the year after. It’s always unsettling in some ways but trust God with it.

David Jung

by Garrett Glende

Hi David, tell me a bit about yourself.

I’m a junior at UCSD, from Cerritos and I’m currently a psychology major.

Can you tell me a little about how you first came to LBC?

It was through a parachurch ministry called CCM, specifically two brothers, Bach Ngyuen and Randy Tsuchiyama, who encouraged me to go out to Lighthouse.

What were your first impressions?

The people were friendly. They were very welcoming and encouraging. Pastor John’s made a big impact and he was very passionate. It was a place where I saw myself being a part of. I could really see myself being a part of this church.

What were some things that made you stay here?

For one thing, it was definitely the gospel centered teaching, the gospel centered perspective that the leaders had. I knew that if I stayed here I would really grow and I really wanted that.

How would you describe college so far?

It’s so liberating that if I don’t put some limiters, I’m afraid that I’ll go too crazy and I’m thankful that there are brothers and sisters who put these limits on me so that I don’t get too crazy.

What thing are you most thankful for in college?

If there was one thing that I am thankful for it would be that God has led me to Lighthouse when He could have chosen to have me fall away or join a church that has horrible doctrine, but He chose to put me at a great church like Lighthouse.

How are you currently serving at church?

The first would be the Sonlight ministry. That was the first ministry that I joined. Also LKC or Lighthouse Kids Club, cleaning ministry, web team for college life, and although it’s not an official ministry I try to minister to people by using my skills in videography.

What are your goals for this upcoming year in the context of college life?

I think definitely one thing would be to minister to the new freshmen and help them, even if they don’t choose lighthouse, to truly see what the gospel is and that it should not be taken lightly. Also just to keep up with my disciplines, not just because I’m an upperclassman now, but just to be excellent in everything.

Describe an encouraging story from church.

Besides just the encouragement notes themselves, if I had to choose just one, there was one time during children’s ministry after I finished a lesson, one of the kids, David Chung, came up to me and told me “thank you for that message. It was really helpful.” And that just touched me. It was really touching.

What is it like to work with the children at church?

It’s really fun. They’re a refreshing bunch of kids. It’s hard sometimes to be patient, but at the same time I’m really thankful for that because I feel like I’m learning to be more patient. Whenever I interact with them or teach them, I genuinely feel like I’m learning a lot.

What is one thing you would like to do before college ends?

Haha find a girlfriend…no no seriously. Hmm that’s tough. I’ve never really thought about it. I think one thing would be to memorize a certain book in the Bible. Not just memorize it, but really grasp it and understand it, making sure that I can apply it. Please don’t put find a girlfriend, I don’t really mean that. I’m just being silly.

Ok, thanks David.

Thanks for the interview. It was fun…I wish I provided better answers.

You did great.

Caroline Shin

by Courtney Chow

Caroline Shin, a second year at UCSD, had become a familiar face to the Lighthouse Family before she moved to La Jolla in the fall of 2007. If you haven’t already, now is the time to meet Caroline and learn how the Lord brought her to a saving faith.

When and how did you become a Christian?

Sometime around the summer of 2006, right before my senior year in high school. I was brought up from a Christian home, but I took my sins so lightly all throughout my life. When my sister (Jen Shin) saw the rebellious life I was living, she told me that I was in need of repentance. After feeling so convicted over my sins, my sister shared the gospel w/me, and for the first time, I asked God for forgiveness & wanted to follow & submit under Christ’s lordship.

Many people might be familiar with your older sister, Jen, but who are the other members of your family?

I have a big family. I have loving parents, and an older brother (with his own family now), older sister (Jen), and younger sister (Aileen). I have to admit, we’re a pretty musical family. We go from the violins to the drums to vocals. Oh and I can’t forget my dad’s saxophone playing to wake me up in the mornings. =)

You finished your first year at UCSD in June. How would you sum it up?

Humbling. I know I’ve made a lot of mistakes this past year, and repenting from those mistakes have shown me that the focus needed to be taken away from myself and to do everything in Christ alone. The more and more my sins were revealed to me, the more I realized my need to be completely dependent on God.

What was your first impression of Lighthouse?

BIG, at least compared to my home church (we had 7 youth group members altogether). Also, how it reminded me so much of a family. I could see the genuine love people have for one another & the unity of the church body.

Why did you decide to become a member?

I wanted to be a part of this “family” and to start serving at a local church. Ever since becoming a member, I’ve been able to build relationships with other sisters at the church who’ve been a HUGE encouragement to me & have held me accountable in my walk.

How are you involved at LBC?

I’m a part of the music ministry (choir & orchestra), and I’m in the college life skit team.

What are you looking forward to for this next school year?

Continuing to build up my relationships with my sisters and brothers, and to be an encouragement to the new freshmen! I’m also excited about moving into an apartment (mainly because I get to cook and be surrounded by the other lighthouse classmates)!

Do you have any advice for the incoming freshmen?

You don’t have to experience everything in order to know what it’s like. Just trust what the Bible has to say when it is good or when it is wrong!

Editor’s Note: October 2008

by Steven Hong

Put away those surfboards and the sunblock and dust off those notebooks—it’s time for school! This is one of the most exciting seasons of the year for our church family. We  see old faces returning and new ones checking out our ministry from the surrounding schools. With that in mind, our newsletter staff has put together a few articles  spotlighting our college ministry and some of its members.
If you are new to our church, we welcome you and thank you for joining us. Our prayer is that you would see our love for Christ in every aspect of our church life—from the praise and preaching to the fellowship and fun. Stick around and see what God’s doing here at Lighthouse!

Put away those surfboards and the sunblock and dust off those notebooks—it’s time for school! This is one of the most exciting seasons of the year for our church family. We  see old faces returning and new ones checking out our ministry from the surrounding schools. With that in mind, our newsletter staff has put together a few articles  spotlighting our college ministry and some of its members.

If you are new to our church, we welcome you and thank you for joining us. Our prayer is that you would see our love for Christ in every aspect of our church life—from the praise and preaching to the fellowship and fun. Stick around and see what God’s doing here at Lighthouse!

Monthly Comic

The Apostle Thomas – Part 3 – Depression, Not Doubt

by Stephen Rodgers

Part 3 of 4: John 20:24-25

This is the classic passage that gave Thomas his undeserved nickname.  Even in secular circles, calling someone a “doubting Thomas” implies an unhealthy degree of skepticism and/or pessimism in the face of evidence that should result in the doubter knowing better.  And yet, if we really examine this passage, is such a moniker warranted?
First, it is interesting to note that Thomas was not with the others when Jesus first appeared to them that Sunday afternoon/evening.  Scripture does not record where he might have been, but we can safely assume that he was not off running errands or getting a haircut.  The other disciples had locked themselves into a room (probably the same room that was used for the last supper) because they feared the chief priests and the religious leaders.  They were traumatized by the death of Christ; they feared further persecution.  And in their grief and fear, they turned to one another for comfort and company.
But not Thomas.
I think that Thomas was not among the others because he simply could not bear it.  He certainly knew these men; he probably loved and trusted them.  But it wasn’t for their sakes that he had wandered the countryside for the past three years.  It wasn’t Peter that he followed.  It wasn’t Andrew that he built his life around.  It wasn’t James or John who he feared the loss of most.
This was the lowest point of Thomas’ life.  His absolute worst fear had come to pass: Jesus was gone, and he was left behind.  At least when Jesus had made that cryptic remark earlier that he “knew the way” there was the implication of an eventual reunion.  But no one comes back from death.  Right?  And so Thomas was in no mood for company, and was shunning even the companionship of his closest friends.  You know the personality type: “leave me alone,” they say.  “I just want to be by myself now,” they say.  “I don’t want to be around anyone else…they don’t understand.”  Pessimists.  Loners.  The Broken.
The disciples were not superstitious men, nor were the people of their day.  This is a common fallacy that opponents of the Gospel message often fall into.  We like to think of any people prior to color television as being superstitious, gullible, and stupid.  “Of course those idiots thought that Mary was divinely impregnated,” they scoff.  “They were too stupid to know the difference!”
Then why does it say that Joseph was of a mind to divorce her quietly?  He knew where babies came from.  He didn’t consider divine providence as a likely or even possible solution until Gabriel showed up.  And believe me, there must have been something remarkable about Gabriel’s presence, because Scripture is pretty clear on the subject of home invasion!  If someone calls my name from next to my bed one night, my first reaction in the absence of evidence attesting to their divine messenger status is to come up blasting.  It’s a win-win situation: presumably angels are immune to physical violence, and psychotic home-invaders are not.  Just like the people back then, we reach for a rational answer first.
Thomas was no different.  He knew that dead people didn’t rise again.  Well, to be more specific, he knew that dead people didn’t rise again unless Jesus told them to.  After all, he had a front row seat when Lazarus walked out of the tomb.  But this was different, Jesus Himself was dead now.  And so Thomas reasoned that they others were either deluded, or perhaps playing a cruel joke on him.
So he said to them, “Unless I see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe.”
And so he despaired…at least until the following week.  But that’s getting ahead of the story.

This is the classic passage that gave Thomas his undeserved nickname.  Even in secular circles, calling someone a “doubting Thomas” implies an unhealthy degree of skepticism and/or pessimism in the face of evidence that should result in the doubter knowing better.  And yet, if we really examine this passage, is such a moniker warranted?

First, it is interesting to note that Thomas was not with the others when Jesus first appeared to them that Sunday afternoon/evening.  Scripture does not record where he might have been, but we can safely assume that he was not off running errands or getting a haircut.  The other disciples had locked themselves into a room (probably the same room that was used for the last supper) because they feared the chief priests and the religious leaders.  They were traumatized by the death of Christ; they feared further persecution.  And in their grief and fear, they turned to one another for comfort and company.

But not Thomas.

I think that Thomas was not among the others because he simply could not bear it.  He certainly knew these men; he probably loved and trusted them.  But it wasn’t for their sakes that he had wandered the countryside for the past three years.  It wasn’t Peter that he followed.  It wasn’t Andrew that he built his life around.  It wasn’t James or John who he feared the loss of most.

This was the lowest point of Thomas’ life.  His absolute worst fear had come to pass: Jesus was gone, and he was left behind.  At least when Jesus had made that cryptic remark earlier that he “knew the way” there was the implication of an eventual reunion.  But no one comes back from death.  Right?  And so Thomas was in no mood for company, and was shunning even the companionship of his closest friends.  You know the personality type: “leave me alone,” they say.  “I just want to be by myself now,” they say.  “I don’t want to be around anyone else…they don’t understand.”  Pessimists.  Loners.  The Broken.

The disciples were not superstitious men, nor were the people of their day.  This is a common fallacy that opponents of the Gospel message often fall into.  We like to think of any people prior to color television as being superstitious, gullible, and stupid.  “Of course those idiots thought that Mary was divinely impregnated,” they scoff.  “They were too stupid to know the difference!”

Then why does it say that Joseph was of a mind to divorce her quietly?  He knew where babies came from.  He didn’t consider divine providence as a likely or even possible solution until Gabriel showed up.  And believe me, there must have been something remarkable about Gabriel’s presence, because Scripture is pretty clear on the subject of home invasion!  If someone calls my name from next to my bed one night, my first reaction in the absence of evidence attesting to their divine messenger status is to come up blasting.  It’s a win-win situation: presumably angels are immune to physical violence, and psychotic home-invaders are not.  Just like the people back then, we reach for a rational answer first.

Thomas was no different.  He knew that dead people didn’t rise again.  Well, to be more specific, he knew that dead people didn’t rise again unless Jesus told them to.  After all, he had a front row seat when Lazarus walked out of the tomb.  But this was different, Jesus Himself was dead now.  And so Thomas reasoned that they others were either deluded, or perhaps playing a cruel joke on him.

So he said to them, “Unless I see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe.”

And so he despaired…at least until the following week.  But that’s getting ahead of the story.

Monthly Comic


About

The Beacon is the monthly newsletter for Lighthouse Bible Church in San Diego, California. It covers a variety of subjects including LBC events, church history, current events from a Christan perspective, ministry profiles, and messages from our pastors and elders. To join the Beacon ministry, please contact Stephen Rodgers.

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