Book Review: Father, Son, & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance

Book by Bruce Ware

Review by Cesar Vigil-Ruiz

Would you consider yourself a bad husband to your wife? A bad son or daughter? Do you dread work? Does the idea of authority or submission rub you the wrong way? These are questions many of us in the church face today when we see the reality of homes where Christ is not the sole focus of the family or the workplace. In terms of the Trinity, why bring this up? The doctrine of the Trinity is seen as a teaching far above us that we don’t see ourselves capable to begin to comprehend what God has said about this doctrine, much less see relevance in it.

In his book, Father, Son & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance, Bruce Ware introduces his readers to look upon the teaching of Scripture and see the beauty of the Trinity that has been hidden from many churches today. The doctrine of the Trinity is seen by believers as simply that – a doctrine. Their whole being is not filled with awe and wonder at the God who has purposely revealed Himself, for our benefit, as triune in His Holy Word. Ware has met the Triune God and is inviting us to be refreshed by the meaty truths of Scripture that truly affects how we relate to both God and others.

Ware gives a brief definition of the Trinity to help Christians clearly articulate this beautiful teaching: “The doctrine of the Trinity affirms that God’s whole and undivided essence belongs equally, eternally, simultaneously, and fully to each of the three distinct Persons of the Godhead” (p.41). Delving into passages such as Gen. 1:1, Isa. 45:5-6, Rom. 3:29-30, Psa. 2, Eph. 1:9-12, Php. 2:5-11, Jn. 17:3, 1 Cor. 8:6, Jn. 1:1, Heb. 1:1-3, and Acts 10-11 (to name a few) draws you to see and behold the glory of the great God in Scripture who shows perfect love within the Godhead and desires to share that love with His creatures, not out of necessity, but out of geniune love and joy overflowing from within His own Being.

This book is broken into explaining each Person of the Trinity deeply rooted from God’s own infallible and inerrant word. To see the love each has for the other is mesmerizing. The Father is the one who is eternally Father, of whom the eternal Son submits perfectly under His authority. While on earth, Jesus sought to do the will of the Father, that which pleased Him (John 8:28-30). The Father sought to have Christ as central in His plan of redemption (Eph. 1:3-12). The Holy Spirit humbly and, without grumbling, works to glorify the Son (John 16:12-14).Do you see the implications this has on us as believers? Being made in the image of God, we are “to image God and His purposes in the ordering of our lives and carrying out of our God-given responsibilities” (p. 133). Do you work to image your God in the way He has revealed Himself at work? With your immediate family and within the family of Christ’s blood-bought bride? As Ware repeatedly states, marvel! Behold your God!

Would you consider yourself a bad husband to your wife? A bad son or daughter? Do you dread work? Does the idea of authority or submission rub you the wrong way? These are questions many of us in the church face today when we see the reality of homes where Christ is not the sole focus of the family or the workplace. In terms of the Trinity, why bring this up? The doctrine of the Trinity is seen as a teaching far above us that we don’t see ourselves capable to begin to comprehend what God has said about this doctrine, much less see relevance in it.
In his book, Father, Son & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance, Bruce Ware introduces his readers to look upon the teaching of Scripture and see the beauty of the Trinity that has been hidden from many churches today. The doctrine of the Trinity is seen by believers as simply that – a doctrine. Their whole being is not filled with awe and wonder at the God who has purposely revealed Himself, for our benefit, as triune in His Holy Word. Ware has met the Triune God and is inviting us to be refreshed by the meaty truths of Scripture that truly affects how we relate to both God and others.
Ware gives a brief definition of the Trinity to help Christians clearly articulate this beautiful teaching: “The doctrine of the Trinity affirms that God’s whole and undivided essence belongs equally, eternally, simultaneously, and fully to each of the three distinct Persons of the Godhead” (p.41). Delving into passages such as Gen. 1:1, Isa. 45:5-6, Rom. 3:29-30, Psa. 2, Eph. 1:9-12, Php. 2:5-11, Jn. 17:3, 1 Cor. 8:6, Jn. 1:1, Heb. 1:1-3, and Acts 10-11 (to name a few) draws you to see and behold the glory of the great God in Scripture who shows perfect love within the Godhead and desires to share that love with His creatures, not out of necessity, but out of geniune love and joy overflowing from within His own Being.
This book is broken into explaining each Person of the Trinity deeply rooted from God’s own infallible and inerrant word. To see the love each has for the other is mesmerizing. The Father is the one who is eternally Father, of whom the eternal Son submits perfectly under His authority. While on earth, Jesus sought to do the will of the Father, that which pleased Him (John 8:28-30). The Father sought to have Christ as central in His plan of redemption (Eph. 1:3-12). The Holy Spirit humbly and, without grumbling, works to glorify the Son (John 16:12-14).Do you see the implications this has on us as believers? Being made in the image of God, we are “to image God and His purposes in the ordering of our lives and carrying out of our God-given responsibilities” (p. 133). Do you work to image your God in the way He has revealed Himself at work? With your immediate family and within the family of Christ’s blood-bought bride? As Ware repeatedly states, marvel! Behold your God

Would you consider yourself a bad husband to your wife? A bad son or daughter? Do you dread work? Does the idea of authority or submission rub you the wrong way? These are questions many of us in the church face today when we see the reality of homes where Christ is not the sole focus of the family or the workplace. In terms of the Trinity, why bring this up? The doctrine of the Trinity is seen as a teaching far above us that we don’t see ourselves capable to begin to comprehend what God has said about this doctrine, much less see relevance in it.
In his book, Father, Son & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance, Bruce Ware introduces his readers to look upon the teaching of Scripture and see the beauty of the Trinity that has been hidden from many churches today. The doctrine of the Trinity is seen by believers as simply that – a doctrine. Their whole being is not filled with awe and wonder at the God who has purposely revealed Himself, for our benefit, as triune in His Holy Word. Ware has met the Triune God and is inviting us to be refreshed by the meaty truths of Scripture that truly affects how we relate to both God and others.
Ware gives a brief definition of the Trinity to help Christians clearly articulate this beautiful teaching: “The doctrine of the Trinity affirms that God’s whole and undivided essence belongs equally, eternally, simultaneously, and fully to each of the three distinct Persons of the Godhead” (p.41). Delving into passages such as Gen. 1:1, Isa. 45:5-6, Rom. 3:29-30, Psa. 2, Eph. 1:9-12, Php. 2:5-11, Jn. 17:3, 1 Cor. 8:6, Jn. 1:1, Heb. 1:1-3, and Acts 10-11 (to name a few) draws you to see and behold the glory of the great God in Scripture who shows perfect love within the Godhead and desires to share that love with His creatures, not out of necessity, but out of geniune love and joy overflowing from within His own Being.
This book is broken into explaining each Person of the Trinity deeply rooted from God’s own infallible and inerrant word. To see the love each has for the other is mesmerizing. The Father is the one who is eternally Father, of whom the eternal Son submits perfectly under His authority. While on earth, Jesus sought to do the will of the Father, that which pleased Him (John 8:28-30). The Father sought to have Christ as central in His plan of redemption (Eph. 1:3-12). The Holy Spirit humbly and, without grumbling, works to glorify the Son (John 16:12-14).Do you see the implications this has on us as believers? Being made in the image of God, we are “to image God and His purposes in the ordering of our lives and carrying out of our God-given responsibilities” (p. 133). Do you work to image your God in the way He has revealed Himself at work? With your immediate family and within the family of Christ’s blood-bought bride? As Ware repeatedly states, marvel! Behold your God!

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The Beacon is the monthly newsletter for Lighthouse Bible Church in San Diego, California. It covers a variety of subjects including LBC events, church history, current events from a Christan perspective, ministry profiles, and messages from our pastors and elders. To join the Beacon ministry, please contact Stephen Rodgers.

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