Archive for February, 2007

New Building Preview

by Kevin Au

Though it hasn’t exactly been at the forefront of everyone’s minds, the new building project has been a subject of anticipation for nearly two years. As we are nearing our final days in our current facility, we look forward to the transition to the new building and all the changes it may bring to the life of our church. Naturally, church is not about the facilities, but a change in venue does allow for some changes to how ministry might look.
“There will definitely be more flexibility in terms of when we can meet. Currently we share the school building with the school and other churches. That really limits when we can hold events and activities at the church,” says Peter Lim.
Though the actual square footage remains roughly the same, the new facilities will have a roomier feel, as it is spread over one floor, and the space is more allocated for our purposes. In addition to the main sanctuary and not including the kitchenette, there will be five rooms:three large rooms and two small ones. The most prominent feature, however, will be the larger main sanctuary, which would enable us to merge into one service again. “Given the current rate of growth in our church and the capacity of the new sanctuary, I’d say it would be about 2 ½ – 3 years before we had to think about two services again,” says Peter. The main sanctuary might have the option of converting into two more adult Sunday school rooms, pending the construction of room dividers.
The transition might come sooner than many might think. As all the ministries continue and the pace of things at church has not slowed, the anticipated move in date might sneak up on some. The only real hurdle standing before the move in date is the timing of fire inspections. It may be possible to even see a move in date of mid- February, though early March is a more realistic target. The date depends on whether we can get an over-thecounter certificate.
With the new building transition come many opportunities to serve. Simply being available to help with different aspects of the move would be greatly appreciated. There are also miscellaneous construction projects that aren’t covered by the landlord, including the stage, decorations, furnishings, and room dividers. Another area to consider is ongoing maintenance of the new building, which is easy to overlook since maintenance and custodial costs are currently covered by the school.
There are few other things to keep in mind. With a transition comes a lot of excitement, but we must remember to even see a building as it truly is: nothing more than a place to facilitate ministry. It is something that God has provided that we might be good stewards of it and use it for His kingdom. With that let’s strive to remember this year’s theme: even use of the new facilities should be for Christ alone.

Though it hasn’t exactly been at the forefront of everyone’s minds, the new building project has been a subject of anticipation for nearly two years. As we are nearing our final days in our current facility, we look forward to the transition to the new building and all the changes it may bring to the life of our church. Naturally, church is not about the facilities, but a change in venue does allow for some changes to how ministry might look.

“There will definitely be more flexibility in terms of when we can meet. Currently we share the school building with the school and other churches. That really limits when we can hold events and activities at the church,” says Peter Lim.

Though the actual square footage remains roughly the same, the new facilities will have a roomier feel, as it is spread over one floor, and the space is more allocated for our purposes. In addition to the main sanctuary and not including the kitchenette, there will be five rooms:three large rooms and two small ones. The most prominent feature, however, will be the larger main sanctuary, which would enable us to merge into one service again. “Given the current rate of growth in our church and the capacity of the new sanctuary, I’d say it would be about 2 ½ – 3 years before we had to think about two services again,” says Peter. The main sanctuary might have the option of converting into two more adult Sunday school rooms, pending the construction of room dividers.

The transition might come sooner than many might think. As all the ministries continue and the pace of things at church has not slowed, the anticipated move in date might sneak up on some. The only real hurdle standing before the move in date is the timing of fire inspections. It may be possible to even see a move in date of mid- February, though early March is a more realistic target. The date depends on whether we can get an over-thecounter certificate.

With the new building transition come many opportunities to serve. Simply being available to help with different aspects of the move would be greatly appreciated. There are also miscellaneous construction projects that aren’t covered by the landlord, including the stage, decorations, furnishings, and room dividers. Another area to consider is ongoing maintenance of the new building, which is easy to overlook since maintenance and custodial costs are currently covered by the school.

There are few other things to keep in mind. With a transition comes a lot of excitement, but we must remember to even see a building as it truly is: nothing more than a place to facilitate ministry. It is something that God has provided that we might be good stewards of it and use it for His kingdom. With that let’s strive to remember this year’s theme: even use of the new facilities should be for Christ alone.

Retreat Recap: The Truth that Dares

by Steven Hong

Last month, the singles ministry held its annual Single Life retreat. The theme of the weekend getaway was “Truth that Dares.” Single Lifers drove an hour east to the Pine Valley Retreat site, and there, our very own Pastor John and Pastor Patrick taught from a variety of books, challenging attendees to be gripped by several basic Christian truths. From the very first evening, Pastor John set a compelling tone by asking attendees to answer to simple, but profound questions in their small groups: Are you a Christian? Do you follow Christ?

In subsequent sessions, we explored the subjects of respectable sins — sins that are seemingly more tolerated by Christians; the joy of fearing God — the paradoxical relationship between joy and fear; and the nature of true Christian love according to Jonathan Edwards and his book, Charity and Its Fruits. As mentioned earlier, each message was followed by provocative discussion questions for the small group times. Overall, it was a challenging time in the Word.

The retreat was not without ample opportunity to fellowship and have fun. Kent Hong, Romi Hong and Brenda Hom led the retreat in a rousing rendition of Moofa Poofa — adapted from their game times during their Argentina Missions trip. One of the highlights of the time was hearing the creative cheers of each team, as one team even used cheers they had learned in Argentina. Additionally, Single Lifers took full advantage of the gameroom. Chris Tou and Pastor John were winners of the Ping Pong tournament and foosball tournament, respectively.

Of course, no Lighthouse retreat is complete without a talent showcase. The Single Life Bonanza comprised of great singing, an impromptu skit and good ol’ fashioned break-dancing. It was certainly an entertaining show.

As always, the retreat was a great opportunity to slow down, evaluate the state of our hearts and fellowship with fellow believers. If you are interested in hearing the sermons, please talk to the audio ministry. Liveblogging notes are also available on the Single Life website.

Last month, the singles ministry held its annual Single Life retreat. The theme of the weekend getaway was “Truth that Dares.” Single Lifers drove an hour east to the Pine Valley Retreat site, and there, our very own Pastor John and Pastor Patrick taught from a variety of books, challenging attendees to be gripped by several basic Christian truths. From the very first evening, Pastor John set a compelling tone by asking attendees to answer to simple, but profound questions in their small groups: Are you a Christian? Do you follow Christ?
In subsequent sessions, we explored the subjects of respectable sins — sins that are seemingly more tolerated by Christians; the joy of fearing God — the paradoxical relationship between joy and fear; and the nature of true Christian love according to Jonathan Edwards and his book, Charity and Its Fruits. As mentioned earlier, each message was followed by provocative discussion questions for the small group times. Overall, it was a challenging time in the Word.
The retreat was not without ample opportunity to fellowship and have fun. Kent Hong, Romi Hong and Brenda Hom led the retreat in a rousing rendition of Moofa Poofa — adapted from their game times during their Argentina Missions trip. One of the highlights of the time was hearing the creative cheers of each team, as one team even used cheers they had learned in Argentina. Additionally, Single Lifers took full advantage of the gameroom. Chris Tou and Pastor John were winners of the Ping Pong tournament and foosball tournament, respectively.
Of course, no Lighthouse retreat is complete without a talent showcase. The Single Life Bonanza comprised of great singing, an impromptu skit and good ol’ fashioned break-dancing. It was certainly an entertaining show.
As always, the retreat was a great opportunity to slow down, evaluate the state of our hearts and fellowship with fellow believers. If you are interested in hearing the sermons, please talk to the audio ministry. Liveblogging notes are also available on the Single Life website.

Book Review: God in the Dock

Book by C.S. Lewis

Review by Stephen Rodgers

Although it has been more than two decades since I first opened my copy of The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, I can still remember the excitement I had in following the adventures of Peter, Lucy, the Professor, Aslan and the rest. “Give me just a little time,” the book seemed to say to me. “Give me just part of an evening, and I will show you a world of wonder.”

In God in the Dock, Lewis has wandered far afield from his fictional accounts of the world of Narnia. Rather the book is a collection of 48 short essays and 12 letters, divided into four major sections that deal with a multitude of issues and questions that confronted both the Christians and skeptics of his time.

Lewis is at his best in his role of “apostle to the skeptics” in this book. His trademark grandfatherly style simply builds reasonableness upon reasonableness, rather than coming out guns blazing in some sort of theological polemic. While he characterized himself as merely “a layman writing to other laymen,” Lewis’ brilliance and intellectual prowess is evident throughout the book. Although the truths he espouses are always presented with clarity and simplicity, the reader cannot help but note that the author is writing in the scholarly tradition. When Lewis humbly remarks in one essay that he “knows a little about this subject” (referring to literature of the ancient world), the reader is advised to take a large step back to avoid the crushing weight of sources and citations that Lewis brings to bear. Fail to do so, and you just might lose a toe or two.

While it should at least be noted that as a member of the Church of England, Lewis’ theology would be considered less rigorous than that of other writers in the Reformed tradition, the simple yet fundamental ideas that Lewis treats in this book do not contradict, oppose, or undermine any Biblical truths. Rather, in his exploration of such topics as “Evil and God,” “Miracles,” “Myth Became Fact,” and “Work and Prayer” Lewis consistently, patiently, and implacably lays out thoughtful and persuasive rationales that fall directly in line with Scripture.

In the essay that the book is named for, Lewis lays out the fundamental truth that carries through the entire work: the depravity of modern man in approaching God as something that must be validated by human terms and experience. In direct, simple, and unrelenting fashion Lewis exposes this “reversal of conscience” and directs the reader to understand the consequences of such a sin, letting them know in no uncertain terms, as we have so often heard, that “life is not about you.”

It is remarkable that more than twenty years later, Lewis’ writings still evoke in me that same sense of wonder and joy that I experienced as a child. Even though I have grown up, and my interests have matured (somewhat at least), it is of no small comfort to know that Lewis’ work stands the test of time, still able to edify in the pursuit of loving my God with all my mind.

Although it has been more than two decades since I first opened my copy of The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, I can still remember the excitement I had in following the adventures of Peter, Lucy, the Professor, Aslan and the rest. “Give me just a little time,” the book seemed to say to me. “Give me just part of an evening, and I will show you a world of wonder.”
In God in the Dock, Lewis has wandered far afield from his fictional accounts of the world of Narnia. Rather the book is a collection of 48 short essays and 12 letters, divided into four major sections that deal with a multitude of issues and questions that confronted both the Christians and skeptics of his time.
Lewis is at his best in his role of “apostle to the skeptics” in this book. His trademark grandfatherly style simply builds reasonableness upon reasonableness, rather than coming out guns blazing in some sort of theological polemic. While he characterized himself as merely “a layman writing to other laymen,” Lewis’ brilliance and intellectual prowess is evident throughout the book. Although the truths he espouses are always presented with clarity and simplicity, the reader cannot help but note that the author is writing in the scholarly tradition. When Lewis humbly remarks in one essay that he “knows a little about this subject” (referring to literature of the ancient world), the reader is advised to take a large step back to avoid the crushing weight of sources and citations that Lewis brings to bear. Fail to do so, and you just might lose a toe or two.
While it should at least be noted that as a member of the Church of England, Lewis’ theology would be considered less rigorous than that of other writers in the Reformed tradition, the simple yet fundamental ideas that Lewis treats in this book do not contradict, oppose, or undermine any Biblical truths. Rather, in his exploration of such topics as “Evil and God,” “Miracles,” “Myth Became Fact,” and “Work and Prayer” Lewis consistently, patiently, and implacably lays out thoughtful and persuasive rationales that fall directly in line with Scripture.
In the essay that the book is named for, Lewis lays out the fundamental truth that carries through the entire work: the depravity of modern man in approaching God as something that must be validated by human terms and experience. In direct, simple, and unrelenting fashion Lewis exposes this “reversal of conscience” and directs the reader to understand the consequences of such a sin, letting them know in no uncertain terms, as we have so often heard, that “life is not about you.”
It is remarkable that more than twenty years later, Lewis’ writings still evoke in me that same sense of wonder and joy that I experienced as a child. Even though I have grown up, and my interests have matured (somewhat at least), it is of no small comfort to know that Lewis’ work stands the test of time, still able to edify in the pursuit of loving my God with all my mind.

Newsletter Ministry

by Stephanie Shin

Chances are that if you are reading this article, you’re already pretty familiar with the fruits of the newsletter ministry. To get a look at the inner workings of The Beacon, the newsletter team was kind enough to answer a few questions in the midst of trying to get their own articles completed before the deadline.
One of the benefits of being a believer in a Bible-teaching, God-fearing church is that there are very real opportunities to build up the body, to preserve the unity of the Spirit and of faith; in a burgeoning church like Lighthouse, we are given many practical opportunities to perfect this bond of unity. Steven Hong, who is heading up this ministry, says, “The newsletter ministry helps in building church unity by giving members one more way to be connected to the body. Through member interviews, event highlights, pictures and ministry profiles, the newsletter can help a church which is growing in numbers maintain a sense of community and common purpose. Also, I hope that the newsletter ministry can also challenge readers to think through larger church issues, through articles like the Church Today column and the book reviews. The leaders continually encourage members to think with a biblical worldview, and our hope is that the newsletter reinforces that message.”
God has blessed our church with great writers. Steven says, “I’ve learned that writing can be a useful tool in ministry. I like editing the newsletter because I get to see, firsthand, everyone’s unique writing styles and how they  use it to edify the body and glorify God.” And every month when Steven sends out an email to the team with a list of topics, members of The Beacon volunteer to write on a first come first serve basis. It’s refreshing to see God using the talents He’s given for His purposes. This is something we really shouldn’t take for granted, as Grace Mao Wu reminds us: “I’m just thankful that I have an opportunity to write in a Christian context. As a journalist at UCSD I am limited in expressing my own thoughts about Christianity in my writing, but in the context of LBC I am able to emphasize what is important to me in my writing without having to censor what I say.”
It’s been a blessing to witness the unexpected fruits of The Beacon. As much as we joke about the monthly beeline for the crossword, I’ve been encouraged by the clusters of people in the foyer laughing and working together to complete the puzzle first. However, rather than skipping through the pages and heading straight for the crossword, I’d recommend reading all the articles through.
What do we hope to see from The Beacon? To personalizing a growing church, We only have so many members and ministries to highlight, but I hope we can expand as LBC grows bigger. I’m sure there will be many unfamiliar faces for many, but I hope the newsletter will help people at least know each other’s names and faces,” (Grace Wu), to helping the body grow in Christlikeness, “I want to see people reading these newsletters and being challenged to be made more like Christ as they interact with people both in and outside of church rather than making a bee-line for the crossword puzzle” (Jen Shin), to improving the layout and interactive elements of the newsletter, I hope to see an interactive element develop, maybe even an integration with the website. Also, I hope one day that we can see some color in the newsletter. That’d be cool,” (Steven Hong), you can be sure The Beacon will be faithfully reporting to you (not quite) live the the goings-on of Lighthouse Bible Church.
Chances are that if you are reading this article, you’re already pretty familiar with the fruits of the newsletter ministry. To get a look at the inner workings of The Beacon, the newsletter team was kind enough to answer a few questions in the midst of trying to get their own articles completed before the deadline.
One of the benefits of being a believer in a Bible-teaching, God-fearing church is that there are very real opportunities to build up the body, to preserve the unity of the Spirit and of faith; in a burgeoning church like Lighthouse, we are given many practical opportunities to perfect this bond of unity. Steven Hong, who is heading up this ministry, says, “The newsletter ministry helps in building church unity by giving members one more way to be connected to the body. Through member interviews, event highlights, pictures and ministry profiles, the newsletter can help a church which is growing in numbers maintain a sense of community and common purpose. Also, I hope that the newsletter ministry can also challenge readers to think through larger church issues, through articles like the Church Today column and the book reviews. The leaders continually encourage members to think with a biblical worldview, and our hope is that the newsletter reinforces that message.”
God has blessed our church with great writers. Steven says, “I’ve learned that writing can be a useful tool in ministry. I like editing the newsletter because I get to see, firsthand, everyone’s unique writing styles and how they  use it to edify the body and glorify God.” And every month when Steven sends out an email to the team with a list of topics, members of The Beacon volunteer to write on a first come first serve basis. It’s refreshing to see God using the talents He’s given for His purposes. This is something we really shouldn’t take for granted, as Grace Mao Wu reminds us: “I’m just thankful that I have an opportunity to write in a Christian context. As a journalist at UCSD I am limited in expressing my own thoughts about Christianity in my writing, but in the context of LBC I am able to emphasize what is important to me in my writing without having to censor what I say.”
It’s been a blessing to witness the unexpected fruits of The Beacon. As much as we joke about the monthly beeline for the crossword, I’ve been encouraged by the clusters of people in the foyer laughing and working together to complete the puzzle first. However, rather than skipping through the pages and heading straight for the crossword, I’d recommend reading all the articles through.
What do we hope to see from The Beacon? To personalizing a growing church, We only have so many members and ministries to highlight, but I hope we can expand as LBC grows bigger. I’m sure there will be many unfamiliar faces for many, but I hope the newsletter will help people at least know each other’s names and faces,” (Grace Wu), to helping the body grow in Christlikeness, “I want to see people reading these newsletters and being challenged to be made more like Christ as they interact with people both in and outside of church rather than making a bee-line for the crossword puzzle” (Jen Shin), to improving the layout and interactive elements of the newsletter, I hope to see an interactive element develop, maybe even an integration with the website. Also, I hope one day that we can see some color in the newsletter. That’d be cool,” (Steven Hong), you can be sure The Beacon will be faithfully reporting to you (not quite) live the the goings-on of Lighthouse Bible Church.

Philippines Scouting Trip

by Jennifer Shin

Our church’s mission statement to make disciples of Christ comes directly from Matthew 28:18-20. As followers of Christ, we are called to not just go but to make disciples of Christ whether we are here in San Diego or in another part of the world. Each summer, we send out mission teams to the Czech Republic and to Argentina to work with churches there in proclaiming the gospel. This past December, we sent two of our own members, J.R. Cuevas and Tim Yu, to the Philippines on a scouting trip for possible future ministry there.

J.R. and Tim visited the city of Alabang, a suburb of Manila, to meet up with a contact, Pastor Marvin Adolfo. In the summer of 2006, J.R. went on a mission trip to the Philippines and visited a seminary during his stay there. He met Pastor Marvin who was a student at the seminary and has kept in contact with him ever since. Since that summer, Pastor Marvin started a church in Alabang. J.R. later brought up the idea to the leaders of possible opportunities in working with that church.

Alabang Baptist Church is fairly young and has only been around for half a year, consisting of about 15-20 single adults. But they still fellowship and worship passionately. Tim and J.R. stated that it was encouraging to see – that not much is needed to worship God. For Alabang Baptist Church, it isn’t about the elaborateness of their worship services. Rather, they are content with what they have and aren’t afraid to sing loudly during praise. Tim also said, “They were really hospitable. You could feel the love there. As the outsider (I’m not Filipino), they took me in and made me really feel at home, like part of the body.” J.R. stated that though the church is young, they desire to serve and worship God in the right way.

Much of their time consisted of spending time with Pastor Marvin and the church, where J.R. taught from the Word, preaching during a Sunday service for the first time (ironically back at home), and Tim shared his testimony of how he came to know Christ. During their time in Alabang, they were able to see the church’s needs and how our own church could work alongside them. Tim and J.R. shared that they were able to see the church’s philosophy in ministry and Pastor Marvin’s heart as well. For J.R., he wasn’t sure of how things would turn out, but through much prayer, he was able to see God’s faithfulness in making everything happen and run smoothly. The church in Alabang has expressed their desire for our church members to return and partner with them in ministry.

Though future ministry in the Philippines is still up in the air, we, as a church body can still bepraying for our brothers and sisters in Alabang – that God would continue to sustain Pastor Marvin in ministry (who is still in seminary and commuting far to be and serve at the church) and for the growth of the church members there.

Our church’s mission statement to make disciples of Christ comes directly from Matthew 28:18-20. As followers of Christ, we are called to not just go but to make disciples of Christ whether we are here in San Diego or in another part of the world. Each summer, we send out mission teams to the Czech Republic and to Argentina to work with churches there in proclaiming the gospel. This past December, we sent two of our own members, J.R. Cuevas and Tim Yu, to the Philippines on a scouting trip for possible future ministry there.
J.R. and Tim visited the city of Alabang, a suburb of Manila, to meet up with a contact, Pastor Marvin Adolfo. In the summer of 2006, J.R. went on a mission trip to the Philippines and visited a seminary during his stay there. He met Pastor Marvin who was a student at the seminary and has kept in contact with him ever since. Since that summer, Pastor Marvin started a church in Alabang. J.R. later brought up the idea to the leaders of possible opportunities in working with that church.
Alabang Baptist Church is fairly young and has only been around for half a year, consisting of about 15-20 single adults. But they still fellowship and worship passionately. Tim and J.R. stated that it was encouraging to see – that not much is needed to worship God. For Alabang Baptist Church, it isn’t about the elaborateness of their worship services. Rather, they are content with what they have and aren’t afraid to sing loudly during praise. Tim also said, “They were really hospitable. You could feel the love there. As the outsider (I’m not Filipino), they took me in and made me really feel at home, like part of the body.” J.R. stated that though the church is young, they desire to serve and worship God in the right way.
Much of their time consisted of spending time with Pastor Marvin and the church, where J.R. taught from the Word, preaching during a Sunday service for the first time (ironically back at home), and Tim shared his testimony of how he came to know Christ. During their time in Alabang, they were able to see the church’s needs and how our own church could work alongside them. Tim and J.R. shared that they were able to see the church’s philosophy in ministry and Pastor Marvin’s heart as well. For J.R., he wasn’t sure of how things would turn out, but through much prayer, he was able to see God’s faithfulness in making everything happen and run smoothly. The church in Alabang has expressed their desire for our church members to return and partner with them in ministry.
Though future ministry in the Philippines is still up in the air, we, as a church body can still bepraying for our brothers and sisters in Alabang – that God would continue to sustain Pastor Marvin in ministry (who is still in seminary and commuting far to be and serve at the church) and for the growth of the church members there.

Book Review: Father, Son, & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance

Book by Bruce Ware

Review by Cesar Vigil-Ruiz

Would you consider yourself a bad husband to your wife? A bad son or daughter? Do you dread work? Does the idea of authority or submission rub you the wrong way? These are questions many of us in the church face today when we see the reality of homes where Christ is not the sole focus of the family or the workplace. In terms of the Trinity, why bring this up? The doctrine of the Trinity is seen as a teaching far above us that we don’t see ourselves capable to begin to comprehend what God has said about this doctrine, much less see relevance in it.

In his book, Father, Son & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance, Bruce Ware introduces his readers to look upon the teaching of Scripture and see the beauty of the Trinity that has been hidden from many churches today. The doctrine of the Trinity is seen by believers as simply that – a doctrine. Their whole being is not filled with awe and wonder at the God who has purposely revealed Himself, for our benefit, as triune in His Holy Word. Ware has met the Triune God and is inviting us to be refreshed by the meaty truths of Scripture that truly affects how we relate to both God and others.

Ware gives a brief definition of the Trinity to help Christians clearly articulate this beautiful teaching: “The doctrine of the Trinity affirms that God’s whole and undivided essence belongs equally, eternally, simultaneously, and fully to each of the three distinct Persons of the Godhead” (p.41). Delving into passages such as Gen. 1:1, Isa. 45:5-6, Rom. 3:29-30, Psa. 2, Eph. 1:9-12, Php. 2:5-11, Jn. 17:3, 1 Cor. 8:6, Jn. 1:1, Heb. 1:1-3, and Acts 10-11 (to name a few) draws you to see and behold the glory of the great God in Scripture who shows perfect love within the Godhead and desires to share that love with His creatures, not out of necessity, but out of geniune love and joy overflowing from within His own Being.

This book is broken into explaining each Person of the Trinity deeply rooted from God’s own infallible and inerrant word. To see the love each has for the other is mesmerizing. The Father is the one who is eternally Father, of whom the eternal Son submits perfectly under His authority. While on earth, Jesus sought to do the will of the Father, that which pleased Him (John 8:28-30). The Father sought to have Christ as central in His plan of redemption (Eph. 1:3-12). The Holy Spirit humbly and, without grumbling, works to glorify the Son (John 16:12-14).Do you see the implications this has on us as believers? Being made in the image of God, we are “to image God and His purposes in the ordering of our lives and carrying out of our God-given responsibilities” (p. 133). Do you work to image your God in the way He has revealed Himself at work? With your immediate family and within the family of Christ’s blood-bought bride? As Ware repeatedly states, marvel! Behold your God!

Would you consider yourself a bad husband to your wife? A bad son or daughter? Do you dread work? Does the idea of authority or submission rub you the wrong way? These are questions many of us in the church face today when we see the reality of homes where Christ is not the sole focus of the family or the workplace. In terms of the Trinity, why bring this up? The doctrine of the Trinity is seen as a teaching far above us that we don’t see ourselves capable to begin to comprehend what God has said about this doctrine, much less see relevance in it.
In his book, Father, Son & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance, Bruce Ware introduces his readers to look upon the teaching of Scripture and see the beauty of the Trinity that has been hidden from many churches today. The doctrine of the Trinity is seen by believers as simply that – a doctrine. Their whole being is not filled with awe and wonder at the God who has purposely revealed Himself, for our benefit, as triune in His Holy Word. Ware has met the Triune God and is inviting us to be refreshed by the meaty truths of Scripture that truly affects how we relate to both God and others.
Ware gives a brief definition of the Trinity to help Christians clearly articulate this beautiful teaching: “The doctrine of the Trinity affirms that God’s whole and undivided essence belongs equally, eternally, simultaneously, and fully to each of the three distinct Persons of the Godhead” (p.41). Delving into passages such as Gen. 1:1, Isa. 45:5-6, Rom. 3:29-30, Psa. 2, Eph. 1:9-12, Php. 2:5-11, Jn. 17:3, 1 Cor. 8:6, Jn. 1:1, Heb. 1:1-3, and Acts 10-11 (to name a few) draws you to see and behold the glory of the great God in Scripture who shows perfect love within the Godhead and desires to share that love with His creatures, not out of necessity, but out of geniune love and joy overflowing from within His own Being.
This book is broken into explaining each Person of the Trinity deeply rooted from God’s own infallible and inerrant word. To see the love each has for the other is mesmerizing. The Father is the one who is eternally Father, of whom the eternal Son submits perfectly under His authority. While on earth, Jesus sought to do the will of the Father, that which pleased Him (John 8:28-30). The Father sought to have Christ as central in His plan of redemption (Eph. 1:3-12). The Holy Spirit humbly and, without grumbling, works to glorify the Son (John 16:12-14).Do you see the implications this has on us as believers? Being made in the image of God, we are “to image God and His purposes in the ordering of our lives and carrying out of our God-given responsibilities” (p. 133). Do you work to image your God in the way He has revealed Himself at work? With your immediate family and within the family of Christ’s blood-bought bride? As Ware repeatedly states, marvel! Behold your God

Would you consider yourself a bad husband to your wife? A bad son or daughter? Do you dread work? Does the idea of authority or submission rub you the wrong way? These are questions many of us in the church face today when we see the reality of homes where Christ is not the sole focus of the family or the workplace. In terms of the Trinity, why bring this up? The doctrine of the Trinity is seen as a teaching far above us that we don’t see ourselves capable to begin to comprehend what God has said about this doctrine, much less see relevance in it.
In his book, Father, Son & Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, & Relevance, Bruce Ware introduces his readers to look upon the teaching of Scripture and see the beauty of the Trinity that has been hidden from many churches today. The doctrine of the Trinity is seen by believers as simply that – a doctrine. Their whole being is not filled with awe and wonder at the God who has purposely revealed Himself, for our benefit, as triune in His Holy Word. Ware has met the Triune God and is inviting us to be refreshed by the meaty truths of Scripture that truly affects how we relate to both God and others.
Ware gives a brief definition of the Trinity to help Christians clearly articulate this beautiful teaching: “The doctrine of the Trinity affirms that God’s whole and undivided essence belongs equally, eternally, simultaneously, and fully to each of the three distinct Persons of the Godhead” (p.41). Delving into passages such as Gen. 1:1, Isa. 45:5-6, Rom. 3:29-30, Psa. 2, Eph. 1:9-12, Php. 2:5-11, Jn. 17:3, 1 Cor. 8:6, Jn. 1:1, Heb. 1:1-3, and Acts 10-11 (to name a few) draws you to see and behold the glory of the great God in Scripture who shows perfect love within the Godhead and desires to share that love with His creatures, not out of necessity, but out of geniune love and joy overflowing from within His own Being.
This book is broken into explaining each Person of the Trinity deeply rooted from God’s own infallible and inerrant word. To see the love each has for the other is mesmerizing. The Father is the one who is eternally Father, of whom the eternal Son submits perfectly under His authority. While on earth, Jesus sought to do the will of the Father, that which pleased Him (John 8:28-30). The Father sought to have Christ as central in His plan of redemption (Eph. 1:3-12). The Holy Spirit humbly and, without grumbling, works to glorify the Son (John 16:12-14).Do you see the implications this has on us as believers? Being made in the image of God, we are “to image God and His purposes in the ordering of our lives and carrying out of our God-given responsibilities” (p. 133). Do you work to image your God in the way He has revealed Himself at work? With your immediate family and within the family of Christ’s blood-bought bride? As Ware repeatedly states, marvel! Behold your God!

The Life of David Martyn Lloyd-Jones

by Pastor John Kim

David Martyn Lloyd-Jones has come to make a pretty significant impact in my life. His commentaries and writings reveal a mind that was enthralled with the Word of God. His devotion to preaching the Word of God and in taking a stand for Biblical truths have been inspirational for many and just recently, I was able to appreciate the ministry of this faithful servant.
MLJ was born in Wales to parents who were not Christians but were religious, and so he was exposed to a nominal form of Christianity while growing up. It was while he had been pursuing his medical studies that God laid a hold of his heart and MLJ was not only converted to Christ in saving faith, but decided to forsake his medical practice and become a preacher to a poor village in Wales. To abandon a privileged position where he was working with a doctor who served the royal family in London was unthinkable to most people. Yet for MLJ, it was simply an extension of his following Christ.
His initial ministry took place in a small church in Sandfields, Aberavon starting in 1926 where without a seminary degree, he committed himself to preaching the Scriptures. He immersed himself in reading significant theological works, always taking a book with him wherever he went, especially during his summer months where he would have time off from his preaching ministry to spend time with his family. It was during these early years of ministry that his focus on preaching the gospel resulted in the conversion of many in the town.
From 1937 to 1968, MLJ ministered at Westminster Chapel, first starting as an associate to G. Campbell Morgan until his retirement in 1941 and then serving as the senior minister until health problems caused him to step down from full-time pastoral ministry. The latter years of his life were committed to editing his exposition of various books of the Bible for print. In 1981, he passed away from cancer after a long and faithful ministry.
MLJ was known as a Calvinistic-Methodist preacher, a strange combination in our day, but something that was not so uncommon in his day. In fact, the whole movement really started with George Whitefield, who in many ways was the catalyst for the whole Methodist movement in England and the American colonies. It was when Whitefield invited John Wesley to join him as a partner in ministry that the two took divergent paths as Wesley took exception to the doctrine of predestination and promoted his emphasis of man’s free will. And so the two branches of Methodism were formed, with the Calvinistic Methodists being the minority. It was even with much surprise to myself when I first read Whitefield’s biography that the concept of a “Calvinistic Methodist” was introduced and I found it to be a novel partnership.
It was MLJ who really epitomized the picture of a Calvinistic Methodist, with his firm commitment to the doctrines of grace, yet communicating with the passion of an evangelist. The calling to preach was one that he took seriously and believed with all his heart that it was to be “logic on fire, eloquent reason…theology coming through a man who is on fire.” Here was someone who had the clinical background, yet he did not shy away from connecting the use of intellect with the expression of genuine emotions. One of his most popular works to this day is Spiritual Depression – a work which really has ministered to many by biblically addressing those who face the challenges of emotional distress.
His interest in reformed doctrine also brought about a revival of Puritan literature. MLJ was instrumental in the starting of the Banner of Truth Trust, which has published numerous Puritan works, and also the two volume biography of MLJ by Iain Murray. Reading his life story and about the challenges he faced was truly inspirational as his love for God, his love for his wife, his love for preaching God’s Word, and his love for people really radiated in variegated ways that really moved my heart.
I had the opportunity to visit the library of MLJ while visiting London this past summer and seeing the books that he used to ground himself theologically was an exciting moment for me. I pictured him reading and digesting various sets like the works of Jonathan Edwards (I still have a hard time even reading the print – it’s so small!), the works of B.B. Warfield (which I have yet to begin), and other books, and I couldn’t help but wonder at the thoroughness with which he studied each work. I am sure that his medical background helped in his deliberate and purposeful examination of truth and in aligning it with the authority of God’s word. But I am even more sure that it was his commitment to study the Word of God with the Spirit of God guiding his studies that fueled his “logic on fire.”
His commentary on Romans was not finished as he retired before he concluded his studies on the epistle. Yet, to read with his typical thoroughness in explaining the text has helped me greatly in understanding its nuances. If anything, I have been incredibly blessed to see that someone who did not receive a formal theological education, was indeed used by God to communicate in a unique and powerful way the sufficiency and authority of the Word of God.
I often tend to do a little bit of “hero worship” when I read about various inspirational figures. But rather than “hero worship”, I think one thing that I have learned as I read biographies of significant figures in church history is this – God chooses to use whom He will for His purposes and He is not limited to any one profile. In fact, God will often use obscure and socially insignificant figures to do great things for the sake of His kingdom. But He can also use those who seemed destined for worldly success as well and mold them into an instrument for His purposes. We can learn and be challenged by many who have preceded us in the walk of faith. While we ourselves might not make the pages of a church history text, we can all strive to be a part of the great family of faith and be bound as one in the service of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ.

David Martyn Lloyd-Jones has come to make a pretty significant impact in my life. His commentaries and writings reveal a mind that was enthralled with the Word of God. His devotion to preaching the Word of God and in taking a stand for Biblical truths have been inspirational for many and just recently, I was able to appreciate the ministry of this faithful servant.

MLJ was born in Wales to parents who were not Christians but were religious, and so he was exposed to a nominal form of Christianity while growing up. It was while he had been pursuing his medical studies that God laid a hold of his heart and MLJ was not only converted to Christ in saving faith, but decided to forsake his medical practice and become a preacher to a poor village in Wales. To abandon a privileged position where he was working with a doctor who served the royal family in London was unthinkable to most people. Yet for MLJ, it was simply an extension of his following Christ.

His initial ministry took place in a small church in Sandfields, Aberavon starting in 1926 where without a seminary degree, he committed himself to preaching the Scriptures. He immersed himself in reading significant theological works, always taking a book with him wherever he went, especially during his summer months where he would have time off from his preaching ministry to spend time with his family. It was during these early years of ministry that his focus on preaching the gospel resulted in the conversion of many in the town.

From 1937 to 1968, MLJ ministered at Westminster Chapel, first starting as an associate to G. Campbell Morgan until his retirement in 1941 and then serving as the senior minister until health problems caused him to step down from full-time pastoral ministry. The latter years of his life were committed to editing his exposition of various books of the Bible for print. In 1981, he passed away from cancer after a long and faithful ministry.

MLJ was known as a Calvinistic-Methodist preacher, a strange combination in our day, but something that was not so uncommon in his day. In fact, the whole movement really started with George Whitefield, who in many ways was the catalyst for the whole Methodist movement in England and the American colonies. It was when Whitefield invited John Wesley to join him as a partner in ministry that the two took divergent paths as Wesley took exception to the doctrine of predestination and promoted his emphasis of man’s free will. And so the two branches of Methodism were formed, with the Calvinistic Methodists being the minority. It was even with much surprise to myself when I first read Whitefield’s biography that the concept of a “Calvinistic Methodist” was introduced and I found it to be a novel partnership.

It was MLJ who really epitomized the picture of a Calvinistic Methodist, with his firm commitment to the doctrines of grace, yet communicating with the passion of an evangelist. The calling to preach was one that he took seriously and believed with all his heart that it was to be “logic on fire, eloquent reason…theology coming through a man who is on fire.” Here was someone who had the clinical background, yet he did not shy away from connecting the use of intellect with the expression of genuine emotions. One of his most popular works to this day is Spiritual Depression – a work which really has ministered to many by biblically addressing those who face the challenges of emotional distress.

His interest in reformed doctrine also brought about a revival of Puritan literature. MLJ was instrumental in the starting of the Banner of Truth Trust, which has published numerous Puritan works, and also the two volume biography of MLJ by Iain Murray. Reading his life story and about the challenges he faced was truly inspirational as his love for God, his love for his wife, his love for preaching God’s Word, and his love for people really radiated in variegated ways that really moved my heart.

I had the opportunity to visit the library of MLJ while visiting London this past summer and seeing the books that he used to ground himself theologically was an exciting moment for me. I pictured him reading and digesting various sets like the works of Jonathan Edwards (I still have a hard time even reading the print – it’s so small!), the works of B.B. Warfield (which I have yet to begin), and other books, and I couldn’t help but wonder at the thoroughness with which he studied each work. I am sure that his medical background helped in his deliberate and purposeful examination of truth and in aligning it with the authority of God’s word. But I am even more sure that it was his commitment to study the Word of God with the Spirit of God guiding his studies that fueled his “logic on fire.”

His commentary on Romans was not finished as he retired before he concluded his studies on the epistle. Yet, to read with his typical thoroughness in explaining the text has helped me greatly in understanding its nuances. If anything, I have been incredibly blessed to see that someone who did not receive a formal theological education, was indeed used by God to communicate in a unique and powerful way the sufficiency and authority of the Word of God.

I often tend to do a little bit of “hero worship” when I read about various inspirational figures. But rather than “hero worship”, I think one thing that I have learned as I read biographies of significant figures in church history is this – God chooses to use whom He will for His purposes and He is not limited to any one profile. In fact, God will often use obscure and socially insignificant figures to do great things for the sake of His kingdom. But He can also use those who seemed destined for worldly success as well and mold them into an instrument for His purposes. We can learn and be challenged by many who have preceded us in the walk of faith. While we ourselves might not make the pages of a church history text, we can all strive to be a part of the great family of faith and be bound as one in the service of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ.


About

The Beacon is the monthly newsletter for Lighthouse Bible Church in San Diego, California. It covers a variety of subjects including LBC events, church history, current events from a Christan perspective, ministry profiles, and messages from our pastors and elders. To join the Beacon ministry, please contact Stephen Rodgers.

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